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Soutenances de thèses - 2017

Understanding Collaboration in the Context of Loosely- and Tightly-Coupled Complex Adaptive Systems

Nathaniel Leduc
Candidat à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Décembre 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Many of the technological and social systems our society has come to depend on can be classified as complex adaptive systems (CAS). These systems are made of many individual parts that self-organize to respond and adapt to changing outside and inside influences affecting the system and its actors. These CAS can be placed on a spectrum ranging from loosely- to tightly-coupled, depending on the degree of interrelatedness and interdependence between system components. This research has explored how the process of collaboration occurs in both a loosely- and tightly-coupled setting using one exemplar of each system. The loosely-coupled exemplar related to disaster risk reduction in two Canadian communities while the tightly-coupled one involved the implementation of a surgical information management system in a Canadian hospital. A list of core elements of collaboration that should be considered essential to the success of all collaborative endeavours was developed as a result: Engagement, Communication, Leadership, Role Clarity, Awareness, Time, and Technical Skills and Knowledge. Based on observing how the core elements of collaboration interacted with one another within each of these example systems, two models were created to represent their relationships. A list of considerations that collaborative tool designers should consider was also developed and the implications of these considerations were discussed. As businesses and other organizations increasingly incorporate team-based work models, they will come to depend more heavily on technology-based solutions to support collaboration. By incorporating collaborative technologies that properly support the activity of these teams—based on the specific type of complex adaptive system in which their organization exists—organizations can avoid wasting time and resources developing tools that hinder collaboration.


Capacity Planning Model for Mood and Anxiety Disorder Outpatients within the CAPA Service Management System: Simulation and Modeling Analysis of Constrained Resource Allocation for an Optimum Treatment Development using the Activity Based Conceptual Modeling Methodology

Miguel Mejicano
Candidat à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Décembre 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This research considers a common healthcare challenge of planning capacity for a clinic and program where patients receive multiple treatment sessions from different resources. As a case study of this more general problem, we considered the particular context of a capacity planning model for the Mood and Anxiety Program at The Ottawa Royal Health Centre (referenced as The Royal for simplicity). The development of this model is done considering that The Royal is implementing a new service system known as CAPA (www.capa.co.uk) with which it is looking to enhance and improve the mental care provided to its patients. In order to develop the capacity planning model, we have created a simulation model using the Arena simulation software. We have also used the ABCMod Framework as the modeling methodology. The ABCMod is an activity based conceptual modelling framework that provides a set of guidelines as to how to build a conceptual model including its structural and behavioural aspects as well as a collection of constructs which include inputs, outputs and parameters among others. The ABCMod framework tools are expected to facilitate the model validation with the project stakeholders. A series of scenarios relevant to The Royal were modeled and analyzed in order to determine how to manage capacity so that the established performance goals within the CAPA system implementation are met. These scenarios allowed us to determine the service level The Royal could provide with its current capacity and also the effects of resource availability and distribution combinations. From our simulation runs, we defined the potential policy implications that would need to be assessed at The Royal in order to achieve its targets and successfully implement CAPA. Additionally, through the application and the ABCMod framework and standard process mapping tools, we were able to reach consensus and validate our modeling approach with the project stakeholders at The Royal. Our model could be further developed and applied in general simulation cases in which two different types of resources provide multiple interventions to their clients.


Competitive Advantage of KIBS Providers: Influence of Knowledge Processes

Soumya Roy
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Novembre 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

KIBS providers are organizations that perform knowledge intensive business activities, mainly for other organizations and in the present age have become key components of industrialized economies. The primary purpose of KIBS providers is to deliver customized solutions to clients through the implementation of three core knowledge processes: knowledge acquisition, knowledge recombination, and knowledge diffusion. Existing research has predominantly focused on understanding the importance of these providers in creating a competitive edge for their clients. However, little is known in terms of how such providers can create an improved competitive position for themselves. Therefore, this research helps to understand whether the use of knowledge processes influences the competitive advantage­ of KIBS providers. A guiding framework developed from literature posits that such generic knowledge processes may provide competitive advantage for a given provider if they are transformed into valuable, rare, inimitable, and well-exploited resources (VRIO). The study follows a holistic multiple case study research design of three IT service providers to refine the existing theory on the influence of knowledge processes on the competitive advantage of KIBS providers. Data was collected through interviews of employees occupying different roles in a company to provide their perspectives on the various parts of the framework. The findings of this study reveal that participants perceive knowledge processes to provide competitive advantage to their companies. However, data analysis using the VRIO framework indicates that knowledge processes do not confer competitive advantage by themselves, but rather through an emerging theme called delivery. Findings also indicate that delivery influences other factors of competitive advantage. The study contributes to the existing literature as it leads to a refined understanding of the relationship between knowledge processes and competitive advantage by highlighting the importance of delivery as a dynamic capability. The study has practical implications for managers as it informs them to focus on delivery to achieve competitive advantage. This capability also helps to improve brand name, reduce costs, and achieve client satisfaction.


Project Management Practices in Small Projects: 5 Cases in a Canadian Hospital Setting 

Monika Jasinska
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Octobre 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Healthcare is continuously changing through means of project work. Small projects in healthcare settings are of particular interest since they are usually not adequately supported by the health institution, and present many challenges of their own. However, collective successful completion of small projects has the potential to significantly impact and improve health service delivery. This thesis examined the value of project management practices in small projects in Canadian hospital settings to acquire new knowledge on this understudied kind of project and propose basic project management practice guidelines for future small projects conducted within these settings. Data collection was conducted in two hospitals in the form of semi-structured interviews with five interprofessional project teams composed of 4-10 healthcare professionals. Qualitative within-case and cross-case inferential processes were applied and findings shed light on the beneficial value of adapting principles of project management to small projects in hospital settings. Given the bottom-up nature of small projects, results suggest it is of significant importance to clearly define and understand the small project, as well as perform a thorough stakeholder analysis to be able to gain the right approvals. Insufficient time dedicated to small project management governed these shortcomings, thus more time to small project management should be allotted. In addition, the presence of a team leader was a significant factor influencing continuous project execution. Lastly, a consolidated list of 43 project management practices deemed important by the majority of participants from all 5 cases was revealed and could serve as basic project management practice guidelines for future small projects conducted in hospitals. Future studies should take into consideration allied disciplines’ contributions such as organizational behaviour to help explain the interplay between group dynamics and small project outcome.


Antecedents of the Positive Work-Family Interface - A Meta-Analysis 

Yanhong Li
Candidat à la M. Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance : août 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This study meta-analyzed relationships between proposed antecedents and both directions of work-family enrichment (i.e., work-to-family enrichment and family-to-work enrichment). Proposed antecedents, which were derived from three existing theoretical models on the positive interface between work and family, include contextual and personal characteristics from both work - and family-domains. Primary studies included in the meta-analyses were from both published and unpublished sources between 1990 and 2016. The results suggest that several contextual and personal characteristics are significantly related to work-family enrichment. Gender’s moderating effect on the relationship between contextual characteristics and work-family enrichment received little support. Comparisons between examined antecedents of work-family enrichment and antecedents of work-family conflict supported the notion that work-family enrichment and work-family conflict are distinct constructs; in other words, enrichment is not merely the opposite of conflict. Practical implications and suggestions on future research are discussed.


Nutrition Care Practices of Family Physicians and Nurse Practitioners in Primary Health Care Settings in Ontario - A Qualitative Study 

Stephanie Aboueid
Candidate à la M. Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance: juillet 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This study aimed to provide an in-depth understanding of the way in which the macro, meso, and micro levels of the health care system affects nutrition care practices of family physicians (FPs) and nurse practitioners (NPs). It also examined how current practices compare to the clinical practice guidelines on the management and prevention of obesity. Three different types of team-based primary care settings were included: 2 Family Health Teams, 3 Community Health Centres and 1 Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic. Within each type of setting, six to eight FPs and NPs were interviewed (for a total n= 20). Site-specific documents and government reports were also analyzed. Findings suggest that the team-based nature improves nutrition care due to the accessibility to dietitians and cost-free service. Electronic Medical Records seemed to be an important enabler for chronic disease management. Duration of medical visits and increasing prevalence of complex patients were barriers for addressing nutrition and weight. Despite the importance of addressing obesity in primary care, it seems that the topic is approached in terms of chronic disease management rather than prevention. FPs and NPs seemed to spare the dietitian on site for patients who have more severe chronic conditions. Nevertheless, the presence of a dietitian on site increased the likelihood of primary care providers bringing up the topic of nutrition. Addressing site-specific barriers could improve nutrition care practices for weight management and chronic disease prevention in the primary care setting.


Exploring Conspicuous Luxury Consumption in Iran: The Role of Individual Factors and Consumer Knowledge

Mohammad Kermani
Candidat à la M. Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance: Mai 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This research tested a conceptual model predicting the propensity to engage in two distinct forms of conspicuous consumption (bandwagon and snob consumption) that was developed by Kastanakis and Balabanis (2014) in a collectivistic Iranian context. This study found that this conceptual model was more successful in accounting for the variance in bandwagon consumption (i.e., conformity seeking conspicuous luxury consumption) than snob consumption (i.e., uniqueness seeking conspicuous luxury consumption) in the Iranian context. In addition to status seeking, it was found that consumer susceptibility to normative influence (CSNI) and consumer need for uniqueness (CNFU) mediates the influence of self-concept on bandwagon consumption. This finding suggests that the relationship between snob consumption and CNFU may differ in the Iranian context. Results also show that the relationships between CSNI, unpopular counter choice conformity (a sub-construct of CNFU) and status seeking with bandwagon consumption were all negatively moderated by consumer knowledge for fashion luxury goods. These findings extend the original conspicuous consumption model and provide some insight for the development of marketing strategies in Iran.


A Simulation Approach for Capacity Planning in an Open Community Care Network

Maryam Zakeri
Candidate à la M. Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance: Février 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

While aging is inevitable, Canada has never experienced such a growing aging population. Since this aging population accountfor a large proportion of hospital stay, post acute care placement for these clients is of significant importance. Compared to younger people, seniors remain in emergency departments and acute care settings for longer periods and are more likely to require community care post?discharge. Therefore, it is important to consider the issue of an aging population and its future health care demands through modelling and simulation of patient flow. Many Local Health Integration Networks are now working on community care resource matching in order to reduce the waiting times by improving patient flow between the hospital and community services with the goal of relying less heavily on long term care as the primary discharge destination. In this line we used simulation techniques informed by an optimization method from related literature in order to determine how various capacity plans will impact the number of patients waiting over a finite multiyear planning horizon. In our simulation model, we incorporate patient’s characteristics and dynamics of patient flow in the network. In this research we seek to bridge the gap between community and hospital care by policy recommendations addressing capacity planning with the goal of reducing number of blocked patients in the system.


How do Managers Build and Manage the Most Innovative Project Teams: Is Social Capital Key? A Case Study of a Large Global Technology Leader

Derek White
Candidat à la M. Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance: janvier 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Innovation is most often tasked to project teams and consequently companies depend upon the innovativeness of these teams for success. The purpose of this research is to better understand how project teams can be built and managed to be more innovative. I investigate which factors help or prevent teams from being innovative and how social capital affects project team innovativeness. The research methodology is a grounded theory case study of a large, global, high-technology leader. Primary data was collected through two rounds of interviews with sixteen project team members and managers at the company’s head office in Sweden and at one of its large sites in Canada. The results show that social capital is essential for building project team innovativeness, and that leadership is crucial for growing and enabling this social capital.

Soutenances de thèses - 2016

Initiation of In-hospital CPR: An Examination of Nursing Behaviour within Their Scope of Practice

Robin Hebert
Candidat à la M. Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Defence: December 2016

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation are the interventions performed by health care professionals in order to preserve the life of a patient suffering cardiac arrest. These tasks are important to the role of nurses because they are the most common first responders to in-hospital cardiac arrest scenarios. The early initiation of CPR and defibrillation is essential in increasing the likelihood of a patient surviving cardiac arrest. In fact, for every minute that a patient does not receive chest compressions or defibrillation when they are in cardiac arrest, therisk for death increases by approximately 10 percent. Despite possessing the knowledge, skills, and training to initiate CPR independently, nurses mayhesitate to perform the appropriate actions in a timely manner. This topic has been studied previously; however, there have been no studies directlyexamining this issue in the Ontario context. This study revealed a number of contextual factors in Ontario influencing nurses’ deployment of CPR and defibrillation including variations in hospital unit types, geography, workload, the availability and quality of technology, legislation andregulation, accountability, as well as economic constraints. This thesis explored the factors that influence the behaviour of nurses in the first responder role by employing a mixed-methods research design. In addition, this research aimed to extrapolate findings on the influence of nurses’ scope of practice on their behaviour by employing the conceptual framework on


End-of-career Practice Patterns of Primary Care Physicians in Ontario

Sarah Simkin
Candidate à la M. Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : décembre 2016

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Incomplete understanding of attrition from the physician workforce has hampered policy-makers’ efforts to achieve optimal alignment of the supply of physicians with population demand for medical services. This longitudinal study of Ontario primary care physicians uses health administrative data to characterize changes in physicians’ practice patterns over time. We examined the workload and scopes of practice of 21,240 physicians between 1992 and 2013. We found that physicians reduce their workloads gradually as they age, retiring from clinical practice at an average age of 70.5. Furthermore, we found that 60% of family physicians who stop providing comprehensive primary care continue to provide clinical services for an average of three years, with reduced workloads, before retiring fully. Our findings clarify the process of physician attrition from the workforce and will help to improve estimates of attrition and make physician workforce planning more accurate and effective.


A Systems Analysis Approach to Colorectal Cancer Screening Access in the Northwest Territories

Caitlin Champion
Candidate à la M. Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance : novembere 2016

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Introduction

The Northwest Territories is a rural and remote setting with higher colorectal cancer rates and lower colorectal cancer screening uptake compared to the rest of Canada. A systems approach to describe and understand the health care processes and system-level factors influencing colorectal cancer screening access was undertaken to inform screening access solutions.

Methods

Interview transcripts of semi-structured interviews with health care providers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis methods directed by a Collaborative Information Behaviour (CIB) and Continuity of Care framework.  System models of colorectal cancer screening processes were developed and translated into a design framework for system dynamics modelling.

Results

Eighteen models of colorectal cancer screening access within the territory were identified involving patient interactions supported by information processes, and demonstrated variable system complexity. Screening access problems identified on the basis of high or low system complexity included screening initiation, colonoscopy scheduling, screening recall and information silos, and were influenced by multiple contextual factors including a transient health work force, social health determinants, and patient travel.  Qualitative models were translated into a system dynamics (SD) design framework requiring simplified representation of health system interrelationships.

Conclusions

In developing screening access solutions in the Northwest Territories, the foundational role of information behaviours and the need for consideration of trade-offs in system transformation are necessary considerations. Optimizing information behaviours through the utilization of health informatics tools such as standardized referral forms and EMRs may improve system-wide screening access.


Can Human Capital be Tracked? An Analysis of Human Resource Disclosures

Mengyan Huan
Candidate à la M. Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : novembre 2016

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This thesis presents a new methodology for measuring and reporting the value of human capital (HC). Building on prior research in strategic HC management and related fields, a disclosure-based HC index, which contains both HC proxies and disclosures scores, is built based on information collected from the annual reports and other stakeholder reports of “the best companies to work for” survey (“Universum” 2010).

This thesis examines the importance of the degree of HC disclosure and its correlation with company “Universum” ranks and tests whether higher employee benefits and welfare are positively related to HC information disclosed in the issued reports. Furthermore, it investigates whether higher levels of financial and non-financial HC information disclosure are associated with better firm performance and tests whether the positive relationship between human capital proxies and firm performance (concluded by resource-based theory and strategic HRM) is still valid during the crisis years (2008-2010). Regression results indicate that human capital information disclosed in previous years has a weak effect on company’s Universum rank and no influence on firm performance. Moreover, the commonly used employee incentive-based management methods may no longer be effective during the economic crisis years. Investing in training during the financial crisis period is critical for better firm performance. More research is needed in the future to examine the role of human capital in firm performance and how it should be measured, managed and governed in modern corporations.


Applying the RE-AIM Model to Asset-based Community Health Interventions: A Multiple Case Study in Tower Hamlets, London, UK

Karolina Kaminska
Candidate à la M. Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : octobre 2016

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Public health policy and practice principally acknowledge a needs-based approach when developing, implementing, and evaluating community health programs. This needs-based perspective receives criticism because it focuses too heavily on what is missing or wrong with communities as opposed to building on their strengths. As a result, community members are perceived as passive recipients, which is disempowering, and ultimately risks creating unsustainable and ineffective programs. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in achieving a balance between the needs-based approach and the asset-based approach, which accentuates positive capabilities. While the amount of literature discussing the benefits of this latter perspective has grown substantially, accompanying evaluation required to sustain continued investment has been limited. Compared to needs-based research, there is less literature on asset-based evaluation. Emphasis on such research could contribute to the progression of evaluation methodologies and theories, ultimately encouraging their use. The purpose of this study is to apply an existing public health evaluation framework – the RE-AIM model (Glasgow, Vogt, and Boles, 1999) – to asset-based community health interventions and to examine the utility of such an evaluation structure across a variety of asset-based health projects. A multiple case study design facilitated comparison of the applicability of the RE-AIM model dimensions – Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance across three cases in the East London borough of Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom. These included the Local Links Asset-mapping project, the Healthy Early Years Project, and the Good Moves project. The RE-AIM framework is additionally guided by principles of the Realist Evaluation approach (Pawson and Tilley, 1997). This research study contributes to asset-based research by providing a guideline and conceptual framework to support asset-based intervention evaluation theory and practice. 


Volatility Modelling Using Long Memory-GARCH Models, Applications in S&P/TSX Composite Index

Saeid Rahmani
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance : juillet 2017

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The statements that include sufficient detail to identify the probability distributions of future prices are asset price dynamics. In this research, using the empirical methods that could explain the historical prices and discuss about how prices change we investigate various important characteristics of the dynamics of asset pricing. The volatility changes can explain very important facts about the asset returns. Volatility couldgauge the variability of prices over time. In order to do the volatility modelling we use the conditional heteroskedasticitcmodels. One of the most powerful tools to do so is using the idea of autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic process or ARCH models, which fill the gap in both academic and practical literature.
In this work we detect the asymmetric volatility effect and investigate long memory properties in volatility in Canadian stock market index, using daily data from 1979 through 2015. On one hand, we show that there is an asymmetry in the equity market index. This is an importantindication of how information impacts the market. On the other hand, we investigate for the long-range dependency in volatility and discuss how the shocks are persistence. By using the long memory-GARCH models, we not only take care of both short and long memory, but also we compute thed parameter that stands for the fractional decay of the series. By considering the breaks in our dataset, we compare our findings on different conditions to find the most suitable fit. We presents the best fit for GARCH, EGARCH, APARCH, GJR-GARCH, FIGARCH, FIAPARCH, and FIEGARCH models.


Obstacles and Enablers to the Professional Development of Skilled Birth Attendants: a Case Study of the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit on the Thailand-Myanmar Border

Caroline Chamberland
Candidate à la M. Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : juillet 2016

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Although Skilled Birth Attendance has been universally acknowledged as essential to progress in the field of maternal health (WHO, 2004), Human Resources for Health deficits are currently impeding the sustainability of essential maternal health interventions on a global scale.  Over the past 30 years, the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) has developed a self-contained health system, which provides health services, including maternity care, to migrants and refugees at the Thailand-Myanmar Border. SMRU’s current maternity workforce is characterized by an acute shortage of Skilled Birth Attendants (SBA) who have attained senior status, and a higher concentration of SBAs at the assistant and junior levels. In light of this imbalance, this study aimed to conduct a multi-level analysis of obstacles and enablers to professional development amongst Skilled Birth Attendants working for SMRU. This single descriptive case study with embedded units of analysis, which incorporated non-participant observation, a template-based personnel file review, individual interviews, and focus groups at two of SMRU’s Birthing Units, represented a unique opportunity to observe and analyze the multiple influences that interact at various levels of a relatively self-contained health system. While contextual instability and cultural inhibitions constituted significant barriers to optimal workforce planning and development at the operational level of SMRU’s microsystem, the solidarity and sense of community exhibited by the SBAs represented important enablers to health system resilience that could be leveraged through culturally sensitive professional development practices.


Entrepreneurial Business Model Design and Development

Matthew Masaro
Candidat à la M. Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : juin 2016

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Business model research is at the confluence of strategy and entrepreneurship research (Demilet al., 2015). From an entrepreneurial perspective, the entrepreneur is the one recombining already existing elements into novel forms (Schumpeter, 1934). While as a strategic concept, business models help expose how practitioners can tap into new markets and opportunities by innovating on this system-level construct (Amit and Zott, 2001). Together in theory, entrepreneurs take already existing ideas and concepts and reapply them into niche or innovative busines smodels. This then allows entrepreneurs to create and hopefully capture value from serving new markets or opportunities. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis is to uncover and examine the processes that start-up entrepreneurs go through while designing and developing their business models. This is done with the intent of deciphering the kind of development that might ultimately lead to a unique or innovative business model. As the research has shown, and the CEOs mandated, business model innovations are a real, powerful, and disrupting form of innovation.entation and evaluation. 


The Effect of IFRS Adoption on Earnings Informativeness in Canadian Family Firms

Adam Bleackley
Candidat à la M. Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : juin 2016

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

In recent years, there has been a global trend of adopting International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). In 2011, Canada joined this trend by implementing mandatory IFRS adoption for publicly traded firms. Proponents of IFRS adoption claim that it will benefit investors by improving comparability and transparency of firms. At the same time, research on family firms has seen increasing focus. Because of family ties to the firm, family firms can exhibit different motivations, behaviors and performance than do non-family firms. In this research, I attempt to gain insight on the effects of IFRS adoption for a unique set of firms, namely publicly traded family firms by examining the effect of IFRS adoption on earnings informativeness. Although previous literature examine the economic consequences of IFRS adoption, my study is the first to my knowledge that examines IFRS adoption effects on the unique set of family firms. I run a pooled regression to examine the effects of IFRS adoption on earnings informativeness. I find that IFRS adoption by Canadian family firms is associated with a statistically significant higher level of earnings informativeness. The findings of this research could have implications for standard setters, minority shareholders of family firms, and academic researchers.

Soutenances de thèses - 2015

Evaluating Social Marketing Sponsorships: an analysis of Coca-Cola Canada and ParticipACTION

Ruben Bagramian
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance: Décembre 2015

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Numerous not-for-profit organizations are developing and implementing social marketing programs aiming to address important social issues. Sponsorship has become an essential tool to obtain necessary funds to run these programs. However, in today’s competitive environment financing social marketing programs is a particularly challenging task. In order to maintain successful sponsorship relationships and improve future sponsorships, organizations should be able to evaluate sponsorships using efficient, proven methods. Thus, evaluation of social marketing sponsorship becomes an important component for both scholars and practitioners. However, this area still remains largely under-researched, especially in an empirical setting. The purpose of this thesis is to address this gap in the literature by focusing on evaluating Coca-Cola Canada sponsorship of the ParticipACTION Teen Challenge program. The results indicate that sponsorship partners have achieved their social marketing objectives by collaborating positively in delivering the program and creating opportunities for participants to benefit from the program. The research highlights main factors that impact effective sponsorship implementation and evaluation. 


Using HIT to support informal caregivers of cancer patients at home: A needs assessment

Zeina Al Awar
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance: Novembre 2015

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Introduction: This research investigated the requirements of an HIT solution that is usable and useful to informal caregivers of cancer patients on home palliative care.

Methodology: A needs assessment method was used with an exploratory and a confirmatory stage. Eight semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were used for data collection. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse caregiver experiences with both inductive and deductive coding.

Result/Discussion: Caregiver needs were extracted into four categories, Implementation, Presentation, Information, and Practical Caregiving, and used to create the application requirements. Five user personas were created based on caregiving intensity and the functional level of the patients, a method of tailoring the application content to the different personas was created, and a low-fidelity prototype of the application was designed.

Conclusion: The findings of this research have the potential to improve the preparedness and coping of informal caregivers of cancer patients on home palliative care.


Building a Bridge between Work-family Issues and Growth Intentions of Female Entrepreneurs 

Ruoxi Xia
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Novembre 2015

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Employing a sample of 116 women entrepreneurs, this study investigated at how work-family issues, including work-family conflict and enrichment, relate to their intention to grow the business that they own or co-own. Results suggest that family-to-work enrichment directly related to women’s business growth intentions, and important family members seems highly salient to female entrepreneurs’ business growth decisions. 


The Influence of Stakeholders on the Sustainable Development of the Wind Power Industry in Canada: The Firm’s Perspective

Éric Didier Moularé
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer
Soutenance: Novembre 2015

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

We currently witness significant developments in the Canadian wind power industry. According to the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA), the total installed capacity as of September 2015 exceeded the 10,000 MW milestone, enough to power more than two million households, all with the potential environmental and economic impacts. However, the industry is still in its infancy with wind power representing only 3 % of the total energy mix as compared to 30 % in some Scandinavian countries. To understand sustainability in the sector, we set out to investigate, using a qualitative case study methodology, the various ways in which stakeholders influence the activities of wind firms. Based on seven cases across some of the leading provinces in Canada, we attempted to uncover the major stakeholders. We then endeavored to understand how those stakeholders influence the short- and long-term development of wind projects and to explain how firms’ size and market conditions factor into the sustainability equation.


Factors affect Individuals choice to be Entrepreneur, comparison between Innovation-driven economies and Efficiency-driven Economies

Juanzi Wang
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Octobre 2015

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of institutional (environmental) factor and personal (attitude, human capital) factor on the probability of becoming an entrepreneur. In particular, this study aims to make the comparison between different types of economies. The data for this study is derived from 2011 Adult Population Survey (APS), 2011 National Expert Survey (NES) of Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) and World Bank Database and covers 37 countries including efficiency-driven economies and innovation-driven countries. This study applies hierarchical logistic regression and uses multilevel modeling for the cross-country, cross-individual dataset. The results reinforce the importance of environmental factor (regulative and normative), attitude factor, and human capital factor. The findings of this proposed study will contribute to the further analysis of the GEM database to understanding the diversity of nascent entrepreneurial activities in different contexts. 


Developing a Pathologists’ Monthly Assignment Schedule: A Case Study at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine of The Ottawa Hospital

Amine Montazeri
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Septembre 2015

Amine Montazeri graduated in 2012 with a Bachelor of Industrial Engineering from the Sharif University of Technology (Iran). She completed an internship at The Ottawa Hospital where she developed an automatic scheduler for the pathology department to schedule their resources easier. She is studying MSc in Health Systems under the supervision of Professor Jonathan Patrick and Professor Wojtek Michalowski at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

In the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, at the beginning of each month, the clinical managers use expert knowledge to assign pathologists to expected daily specimens based on the criteria of workload restrictions, clinical sub-specialties, and availability.   Since the size of the pathologists’ assignment problem is large, finding a feasible assignment manually is a very time-consuming process that takes a number of iterations over a number of days to complete. Moreover, every time there is a need to make a revision, a new assignment needs to be developed taking into account all the above criteria. The goal of this research is to develop an optimization model and a decision support tool that will help with monthly staffing of pathologists based on the criteria outlined above. 


Value relevance of the voluntary disclosure of advertising expenditure: A study of Canadian listed companies

Xuchen Hu
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Septembre 2015

Xuchen Hu obtained a Bachelor’s degree with Honours in Accounting and Finance from the University of Liverpool in England. Heiscurrently studying under the supervision of Ajax Persaud and Philip McIlkenny, Associate Professors at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Advertising expenditure is one of the most important budget items supporting marketing activities for most companies, and may be treated as an intangible asset. Through the impact on demand and costs, advertising activities affect the firm’s pricing and output decisions as well as the firm’s market value (Tannous, 1997; Chauvin & Hirschey, 1994). Despite the significant economic importance of advertising expenditure, not much attention has been given to the value relevance of advertising expenditure and the impact of advertising expenditure disclosure on firms’ market value. Most of the empirical studies for value relevance of advertising expenditure have been conducted using data from the US and UK Academic research on the value relevance of advertising expenditure in Canada is nonexistent. The accounting standard applied in Canada is different from that used in prior US and UK studies. . Canada adopts Canadian GAAP before 2011, and switches to IFRS from 2011onwards. Both regimes do not require firms in Canada to disclose advertising expenditure. However, most US studies use data before 1994 to analyze value relevance of advertising expenditure. Before 1994, disclosing advertising expenditure is mandatory for US firms under US GAAP. The UK evidence uses data before 2005, during which period UK firms still adopt UK GAAP. Although UK. GAAP does not require companies to disclose advertising expenditure, unlike IFRS, different accounting standards can lead to different financial data reporting and different results. In addition, studies on the impact of voluntary disclosure of advertising expenditure on market value are nonexistent. Furthermore, Canada has a more stable financial system than that of the US and UK In this context, the objective of this thesis is to initiate research on the important dimension of advertising expenditure among Canadian firms. The findings of this thesis will enhance understanding of the relationship between advertising expenditure and market value, and companies’ decisions to voluntarily disclose advertising expenditure on their market value.


Optimizing Surgical Scheduling - Through Integer Programming and Robust Optimization

Shirin Geranmayeh
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance: Septembre 2015

Shirin Geranmayeh studied Industrial Engineering in Iran. She was also involved in a project with the aim of estimating bed capacity for Orthopaedic department at Singapore General Hospital. Currently, she is enrolled in the MHS program under the supervision Professor Jonathan Patrick and Professor Jonathan Li.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This project proposes and verifies a number of optimization models for re-designing a master surgery schedule with minimized peak load of inpatients at ward. All the models include limitations on Operating Rooms and surgeons availability. Surgeons` preference is included with regards of consistent weekly schedule over a cycle. Uncertain property of patients` length of stay was incorporated using discrete probability distributions with correspondence to surgeons. Furthermore, robust optimization was utilized to immunize the ward occupancy against the uncertainty of number of inpatients a surgeon may send to the ward per his block. Different scenarios were developed and evaluated for the performance measure at ward. The models were solved analytically for different scenarios using Cplex and were verified by an Arena simulation model. 


Export Propensity of Canadian SMEs: A Gender Based Study

Xiaolu Liao
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Mai 2015

Xiaolu (Diane) Liao obtained a Bachelor’s Degree of Administration from Sun Yat-Sen University (SYSU), Guangzhou, China. She is currently studying under the supervision of Allan Riding, Full Professor, and Miwako Nitani, Assistant Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Export is closely associated with job creations and national productivity in Canada. From the report of Industry Canada in 2013, export accounts for up to 30% of the Canadian GDP since 2010. Although only around 10% of Canadian SMEs exported in 2011, these exporters contributed to more than 40% of Canada’s total value of exports. However, female-owned SMEs are significantly less likely to export, even after controlling for systemic differences in gender (Orser et al., 2008). An increase of female’s participation in export activities would generate considerable economic welfare to the benefit of the Canadian economy. Thus, this thesis seeks to develop a better understanding of the reasons behind this disproportionate gender distribution in export propensity. Since women-owned SMEs have been verified to be inherently less likely than male-owned SMEs to export, this thesis focuses on the rationale behind their decision-making process: What are the significant determinants of SME owners’ export decisions? How gender interacts in this decision-making process? Findings of this thesis will hold implications for policy makers with respect to promotional policies and assistance programs.


The Influences of the NICU Microsystem on Mothers’ Experiences

Emily Rowland
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Avril 2015

Emily Rowland graduated in 2010 with a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) with a double major in Psychology and Communications from the University of Ottawa. She studied under the supervision of Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, and Muriel Mignerat, Assistant Professor at the Telfer School of Management during her MSc in Health Systems. Emily is enrolled to begin a PhD in Social and Behavioural Sciences at the University of Toronto in September 2015.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The goal of this project was to explore mothers’ experiences of caring for infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) using a microsystem perspective. This perspective focuses on the structure, processes and people and in so doing allows for a critical exploration of how these elements work together to influence mothers in the NICU. The research framework involved an institutional ethnography to explore care delivery, relationships, and discourses in the NICU. Data was collected using nonparticipant-observations, interviews, and collection of discourse artifacts. There is clear evidence that caring for an infant in the NICU can result in significant increases in maternal stress and associated outcomes. Results from triangulation of the data indicated that being separated from the infant and learning to mother in the unit were particularly salient experiences retold by the mothers. These experiences were affected – either positively or negatively – by different elements of the microsystem including consistency in communications, increased opportunities for mothers’ inclusion in decision-making and infant care and lastly, access to more support resources. Implementing improvements to the microsystem could better empower mothers adjusting to parenthood within the NICU context.


Organizational Resilience Indicators Based on a Salutogenic Orientation

Shannon Tracey
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Mars 2015

Candidate in the Master of Science in Health Systems program, Shannon is studying under the supervision of Tracey O’Sullivan, Associate Professor at the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, and Daniel Lane, Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management. In the summer of 2013, she completed an internship at Wageningen University (Health and Society Group) in the Netherlands, where she worked on a project looking at organizational resilience and the home care sector. She is also a Research Assistant for Dr. Tracey O’Sullivan in the Resilience and High Risk Populations (RHRP) Research Lab at the University of Ottawa where she has had the opportunity the help with the EnRiCH project and a project titled “Mapping Organizational Assets to Enhance Disaster Resilience: A Salutogenic Approach to Business Continuity”.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Disasters are common reminders of the need for communities to engage in emergency preparedness initiatives to enhance their resilience. Organizational resilience is identified as being imperative to both community resilience and the survival and success of the organization itself following a disaster. Business continuity planning is a strategy to ensure operations during a disruption and the promotion of organizational resilience. Evident within continuity planning, is the risk-based orientation focusing on potential risks and threats to the operations of an organization. Asset-mapping exercises have the potential to provide additional information that can allow for the identification of assets and capabilities already present within the organization. In order to gauge whether this strategy boosts an organization’s resilience, indicators must first be identified. The objective of this research is to build the evidence base for business continuity planning and organizational resilience, and to provide information for decision-makers to facilitate the development of continuity plans and to indicate their effectiveness for essential service organizations, using an asset-based approach.

Soutenances de thèses - 2014

INGO Performance Management Practices and the Need for Accountability

Brad Conlin
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2014

Brad Conlin obtained a B.Comm in Human Resource Management from the Telfer School of Management at the University of Ottawa. He is studying under the supervision of Sharon O’Sullivan, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This study aims to provide a comprehensive look at the current state of best practices in performance appraisal systems in the public and private sector. From this, the main objective for this research paper is to investigate the reasons why INGOs are not currently able to properly implement a ‘best practices’ based performance appraisal system. Furthermore, this paper will provide both future research questions, as well as practitioner based recommendations. In addition, I will examine the need for higher levels of accountability in INGOs through appropriate performance appraisal systems.


The Role of Peer Support Providers in Inter-Professional Mental Health Care Teams

Sarah Asad
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2014

Sarah Asad graduated in 2012 with an Honours Bachelor in Health Sciences from University of Ottawa. She is studying under the supervision of Samia Chreim, Associate Professor at Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

In recent years, peer support in mental health has become an opportunity for individuals who have recovered from mental illnesses to perform meaningful work while contributing their perspective of mental health care delivery. Individuals who provide peer support are often referred to as peer support providers. This qualitative study explores construction of peer support providers’ roles within inter-professional mental health care teams. The study focuses on factors influencing peer support providers' integration; implications of such integration to stakeholders; and views on introducing peer support certification. Interviews were conducted with peer support providers in two formal models of peer support employment in health care organizations in Ontario. Using a grounded theory approach to analyze data, the findings point to a variety of factors that enable peer support providers' integration as well as the challenges that they face in role construction. Understanding of role construction and factors influencing integration may benefit peer support providers and health care organizations about to integrate the role.


Perceived Barriers to the Use of Electronic Health Records for Infectious Disease Surveillance in Canada

Jessica Scott
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2014

Jessica graduated with a Bachelors of Health Sciences (Honours) and a Bachelor of Social Sciences from the University of Ottawa in 2010 and 2011 respectively. She is co-supervised by Professor Raywat Deonandan from the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences and Professor Craig Kuziemsky from the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The electronic health record (EHR) has been identified as a key component to the advancement of the Canadian health care system. EHR technologies allow for a unique opportunity for the collection of rich, complete, real-time information regarding infectious disease that can be vital to the effective and efficient surveillance of infectious disease. The purpose of this thesis is to examine the potential interface that exists between EHR technologies and infectious disease surveillance in Canada. As well, it examines the perceived barriers to making such a system a reality, from the viewpoint of key stakeholders involved.


Awareness and Motivation in Collaborative Practice for Disaster Management

Michael Falconi
Candidat à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2014

Michael Falconi graduated in 2012 with a Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) from the University of Ottawa. He is co-supervised by Professor Tracey O’Sullivan at the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences and Professor Craig Kuziemsky at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Disasters and emergency situations are prevalent worldwide and there is a need to engage high-risk populations in collaborative disaster management activities in order to improve resilience that is inclusive of the whole community. Collaboration is a complex dynamic process relying on continuous participation and commitment, thus it is important to investigate facilitators that initiate and sustain collaborative action. It is clear from extant literature that awareness has a supportive influence on collaboration, however there is need for a better understanding of how this interaction activates action toward collaborative disaster management activities, especially for high-risk populations. Thus the purpose of this study is to understand how awareness activates individuals to collaborate to better engage high-risk individuals in disaster management activities and improve community resilience in future disasters.


An Analysis of the Determinants of Internal Control Disclosure by Multinational Corporations

Zakaria Nehari Talet
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Novembre 2014

Zakaria Nehari Talet graduated from King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, where he obtained his BSc in Accounting and Management Information System. Zakaria is currently studying under the supervision of Daniel Zéghal, Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The 2007 financial crisis had put pressure on companies for more transparency on internal control. Disclosure on internal control plays an important role in decreasing information asymmetry, reducing risk and uncertainty as well as improving investors’ confidence. In response to investors’ pressure, the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC, 2008) requires corporations to disclose in the annual reports certain information related to assessment and effectiveness of internal control.

The objective of this study is to analyze the content of disclosure on internal control in multinational corporations’ annual reports and to investigate the determinants of disclosure. The study questions whether there are differences in the content, volume and quality of disclosure between multinational corporations and what factors could explain these differences?

This research is based on 178 multinational corporations selected from the 2012 ranking of Global 500 published by Fortune Magazine. Content analysis was used to analyze the volume and quality of internal control information disclosed in the multinational corporations’ annual reports. Based on univariate and multivariate analysis, results seem to indicate that national factors are more significant in explaining the differences in disclosure than governance and operational factors. These findings could be relevant to a number of stakeholders concerned with multinational corporations’ activities and performances.


Testing the Cultural Cognition Hypothesis in a Canadian Undergraduate Student Population

Ioana Arbone
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Octobre 2014

Ioana Arbone graduated in 2012 with a Bachelor of Arts with Specialization in Psychology from the University of Ottawa. She is studying under the supervision of Kevin Brand, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management, and Wojtek Michalowski, Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This study aims to see the association between worldviews and HPV vaccine risk perceptions in a sample of Canadian undergraduate students enrolled in Health Sciences and Business programs at the University of Ottawa. It is a follow-up to the Kahan et al. (2010) research in the U.S. that showed the association to be present in a nationally representative U.S. sample. In addition to searching for this association in the Canadian context, this study examines whether worldviews differ between (a) men and women; and (b) students with health sciences and with business degrees. Furthermore, this study tests a set of candidate questions for supplementing the worldview questionnaire of Kahan et al. (2010). The findings of this study are that worldviews are related to HPV vaccine risk perceptions, though there are some differences between our findings and Kahan et al. (2010) findings. With respect to gender, men were more hierarchical. Finally, certain healthcare items were identified as possible benefiting for refinement and future use in Canadian worldview questionnaires.


Understanding Variability in Modern Cross-Border Shopping Occasions

Michael Lever
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Octobre 2014

Michael Lever graduated Summa Cum Laude in 2010 with a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) from the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. He is supervised by Michael S. Mulvey, Assistant Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Throughout history, consumers have crossed borders to hunt for bargains or to access unique or varieties of items that are not available locally. Though the phenomenon of cross-border shopping is nothing new, the emergence of e-commerce and digital technologies has made it easier than ever for people to shop online with merchants across the world. The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate the differences between internal and external variations of cross-border shopping motivations, the changes that occur due to advancements in various technologies, and the spatial patterns and mapped occasions that appear from each cross-border shopping episode. A qualitative, ethnographic approach has been used to explore the phenomena of interest from a first-hand perspective, and provides a detailed examination of the contemporary cross-border shopping landscape. Findings assist in developing this framework, after conducting detailed participant observation, structured and unstructured shopper interviews, in-depth shopper interviews, and inside source interviews. The results indicate a range of variability stemming from generational, social, and personal differences, along with technological drivers of change including near-field communication and other digital information, and lastly an outline of the trajectories of cross-border shopping occasions using occasion mapping to illustrate these important differences. Implications and future research are also discussed.


Building an Ontology of Community Resilience to a Disaster

Sarah Newell
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Octobre 2014

Sarah Newell graduated in 2012 with a Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) from the University of Ottawa. She is co-supervised by Professor Tracey O’Sullivan at the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences and Professor Wojtek Michalowski at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Disasters such as the Alberta floods, the Lac-Megantic derailment, and the Ebola outbreak, all having occurred in the past year and a half, emphasizing the importance of building community resilience in order to respond to such events. While there is a substantial body of research about the key components that make a community resilient to a disaster, this has not been represented in a systematic, structured way. Ontology engineering is a method that can be used to structure and organize the knowledge about community resilience to a disaster in a systematic way. This thesis will demonstrate how ontology can be used as a tool to identify the complexity within the field by articulating the different elements of community resilience and the relationships between these components in a structured way. This method also provides the ability to reason using an ontology to manipulate and infer new knowledge.


Do Gendered Social Institutions and Resources Promote Women's Entrepreneurial Intentions? A Multi-Country Study

Meng Jin
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Août 2014

Meng Jin has studied at the East China University of Science and Technology, China, where she obtained a BBA in Human Resources Management and ICN Business School, France, where she obtained a BBA. Meng is currently studying under the supervision of Professor Ajax Persaud and Professor Sandra Schillo at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Women entrepreneurship garners substantial interests from both academics and policy-makers because many issues that affect entrepreneurship generally also have a gender dimension to them. Focusing specifically on how these factors affect women enterprises could reveal insights that lead to a more nuanced understanding of entrepreneurship theory and practice. It could also inform policy design and development to promote greater participation of women in entrepreneurial ventures. This study aims to contribute to the literature by exploring the influence of gendered institutions, gendered resources, and women's entrepreneurial readiness on women's entrepreneurial intentions across countries with different economic development level. The study utilizes recent data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor and Social Institutions and Gender Index. It employs factor analysis and logistic regression to analyze the data.


Are They Really Different: The Entrepreneurial Process from the Perspective of Different Generations of Immigrant Entrepreneurs

Maria El Chababi
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Août 2014

Maria obtained her bachelor in Business and Management from Saint Joseph University (Lebanon). She is studying under the supervision of Samia Chreim, Associate Professor, and the co-supervision of Mark Freel, Full Professor at Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Immigrant entrepreneurship is defined as business establishment and ownership among immigrants who arrive to a new host country. Immigrant entrepreneurship has become an important theme due to the increasing rates of immigration to developed countries, and its impact on their economic development. However it is also discredited and qualified as low value-added, rarely innovative, restricted to the ethnic communities and with stagnating growth potential. Following this debate, a new research stream affirms that immigrants should not be treated as one entity. Thus attention is shifting towards groups of immigrant entrepreneurs that were previously neglected in the literature. One such group consists of the second generation children of immigrants. Work to date provides ample investigation about immigrant entrepreneurs and their entrepreneurial process; however there is less research on similarities and differences in the entrepreneurial process experienced by first and second generation immigrant entrepreneurs. Despite some recent research on second generation immigrant entrepreneurs, this topic remains understudied. The objective of this study is to understand, from a multi-level perspective, how different generations of immigrant entrepreneurs experience the entrepreneurial process. Using a grounded theory approach and qualitative in-depth interviews, the findings indicate that first and second generation immigrant entrepreneurs experience the entrepreneurial process differently by facing different micro and macro level enablers and obstacles. They also recognize, evaluate and exploit opportunities differently. The extent to which they are embedded in specific environments affects their entrepreneurial experiences.

As a key part of the C-Change International Community-University Research Alliance (ICURA) project for managing adaptation to environmental change in coastal communities of Canada and the Caribbean, this thesis develops a framework and analytical model for domestic supply chain management in humanitarian aid and disaster relief in the event of severe storm and flooding in the Canadian C-Change community of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. In particular, the focus includes quantitative modeling of two specific aspects during the preparedness phase for emergency management: (1) inventory prepositioning and (2) transportation planning. In addition, this thesis proposes and analyses the characteristics of an effective supply chain management framework in practice to assist Canadian coastal communities in improving their preparation and performance in disaster relief efforts. The results indicate Charlottetown system effectiveness and decreased time to assist affected people are improved by distributing central emergency supply among more than one base station.


Supply Chain Management in Humanitarian Aid and Disaster Relief

Mingli Liu
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Août 2014

Mingli Liu has studied in the School of Information Resource Management, Renmin University of China, majoring in Information Management and Information System, and has obtained the Bachelor of Management degree. She is studying under the supervision of Daniel E. Lane, full professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Humanitarian aid and disaster relief are delivered in times of crises or natural disasters, such as after a conflict or in response to a hurricane, typhoon, or tsunami. Different from regular aid programs, aid and relief are provided to deal with emergency and immediate local areas, and to shelter affected people and refugees impacted by sudden traumatic events. There is evidence that natural and man-made disasters are increasing in numbers all around the world, affecting hundreds of millions of people every year. In spite of this fact, only in recent years – beginning in 2005 – has management of the supply chain of resources and materials for humanitarian aid and disaster relief been a topic of interest for researchers. Consequently, the academic literature in this field is comparatively new and still sparse, indicating a requirement for more academic studies.

As a key part of the C-Change International Community-University Research Alliance (ICURA) project for managing adaptation to environmental change in coastal communities of Canada and the Caribbean, this thesis develops a framework and analytical model for domestic supply chain management in humanitarian aid and disaster relief in the event of severe storm and flooding in the Canadian C-Change community of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. In particular, the focus includes quantitative modeling of two specific aspects during the preparedness phase for emergency management: (1) inventory prepositioning and (2) transportation planning. In addition, this thesis proposes and analyses the characteristics of an effective supply chain management framework in practice to assist Canadian coastal communities in improving their preparation and performance in disaster relief efforts. The results indicate Charlottetown system effectiveness and decreased time to assist affected people are improved by distributing central emergency supply among more than one base station.


Cross-Border Venture Capital Investments: An Analysis of Exit Outcomes for Canadian Firms

Shuangshuang Kong
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juillet 2014

Shuangshuang Kong obtained a Bachelor’s Degree of Management from Qingdao University (China). She is studying under the supervision of Allan Riding, Deloitte Professor in the Management of Growth Enterprises, and Miwako Nitani, Assistant Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Foreign investors are making larger investments in the Canadian VC market than domestic investors, and Canadian VC exits are primary M&As. Providing a joint exploration of foreign VCs’ participation and VC exits through M&As, this paper reports that the presence of foreign VCs in the Canadian market is accompanied with mixed exit-related outcomes. On the one hand, foreign VCs’ participation is associated with higher propensity of a successful exit through IPO, greater capital availability, and shorter time to exit. On the other hand, the relation between foreign VCs’ participation and lower payment per dollar of VC investment raises concerns about monetary returns to Canadian investee firms and Canadian syndicate VCs. These empirical findings address the role of foreign VCs in financing Canadian firms, and will help to facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the Canadian VC market, as well as contributing to the growing body of literature on cross-border VC investment.


Cost-effectiveness of Combining MRI with Mammography for Breast-cancer Screening among High-risk Population in Ottawa

Hadeel Al Yacoob
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2014

Hadeel AlYacoob is a graduate from King Faisal University (KFU), Dammam, Saudi Arabia with a Bachelor in Health Information Management and Technology. She is studying under the supervision of professor Douglas Angus and co-supervision of professor Jonathan Patrick.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Breast cancer remains the most prevalent form of cancer among women in Canada and it currently comprises 26% of the incidence of cancer within this demographic group. Breast cancer is considered the second leading cause of mortality among women in Canada in general with an estimated 5,000 deaths in 2014. Furthermore, high-risk group of women has a two-to-five times higher lifetime risk of developing breast cancer than other women. Usually breast cancer develops at a younger age (20 years earlier on average) among high-risk women than within the general population and the disease is more aggressive and has a faster rate of progression. Previous research has shown that conventional mammography screening is not effective for women at high risk because of it’s lower sensitivity among these women. Recently, MRI screening has been proposed as a complementary approach to mammography for high-risk women in Ottawa. This thesis will conduct an economic evaluation of combining both screening strategies for this group of high-risk women.


Organizational Resilience Indicators Based on a Salutogenic Orientation

Shannon Tracey
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2014

Shannon Tracey graduated in 2012 with a Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) from the University of Ottawa. Last summer, she completed an internship at Wageningen University (Health and Society Group) in the Netherlands, where she worked on a project looking at organizational resilience and the home care sector. She is also a Research Assistant for Dr. Tracey O’Sullivan in the Resilience and High Risk Populations (RHRP) Research Lab at the University of Ottawa where she has had the opportunity the help with the EnRiCH (Enhancing Resilience and Capacity for Health) project and a project titled “Mapping Organizational Assets to Enhance Disaster Resilience: A Salutogenic Approach to Business Continuity”.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Disasters are common reminders of the need for communities to engage in emergency preparedness initiatives to enhance their resilience. Organizational resilience is identified as being imperative to both community resilience and the survival and success of the organization itself following a disaster. BCP is a strategy to ensure operations during a disruption and the promotion of organizational resilience. Evident within BCP, is the risk-based orientation focusing on potential risks and threats to the operations of an organization. Asset-mapping exercises have the potential to provide additional information that can allow for the identification of assets and capabilities already present within the organization. In order to gauge whether this strategy boosts an organization’s resilience, indicators must first be identified. The objective of the proposed research is to build the empirical evidence base for BCP and organizational resilience, and to provide information for decision-makers to facilitate the development of continuity plans and to indicate their effectiveness for essential service organizations, using an asset-based approach.


Is It Best to Have It All: Emotional, Cognitive and Behavioral Consequences of Conflicting Expert Advice on Decision Makers

Xiaoxi Chang
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2014

Xiaoxi Chang obtained a B.Sc in Applied Psychology from Soochow University (China). She is studying under the supervision of Silvia Bonaccio, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Whether it is in private or professional lives, people are called to make decisions and they tend to seek expert advice. The old adage indicates that more heads are better than one. Receiving more information is often helpful to decisions. However, getting multiple conflicting expert advice might put decision makers in difficult situations. Little is known about their feelings, thinking, and behaviors under such conditions. This research aims to fill the gap and understand the abovementioned consequences of taking multiple conflicting expert advice when making professional (i.e., business or personnel-related) decisions. Using an interview-based qualitative approach, this research sheds light on contextual characteristics where conflicting expert advice may be more beneficial (or harmful), which contributes practical recommendations to improve professional decisions. In sum, this research seeks to verify whether the common wisdom of “more is better” holds up to empirical scrutiny, and suggests that it is “no pain, no gain”.


SME Credit Pricing Influencers: Illustrations from the Computer Animation and Visual Effects Industries

Elliott Bourgeois
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Mai 2014

Elliott Bourgeois has obtained a Bachelor of Commerce at the Telfer School of Management. Elliott is studying under the supervision of Mark Freel, Full professor and RBC Financial Group Professor in the Commercialization of Innovation at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

It has been empirically established that the differences in the lending rates charged by traditional and large lenders to large versus small creditors can be largely attributed to differences in information opacity (Dietrich, 2012; Holmes et. al. 1994). The greater the information possessed by the creditor, the lower the rate charged to the borrower, suggesting again that a risk premium is being charged for information opacity. Securitizing debt with collateral can reduce the lending rate charged, however differences in the rates charged cannot be fully explained by information opacity or availability of collateral. This paper uses data from the UK Survey of SME Finances to explore factors internal and external to the firm that are significant in influencing credit prices, providing insight on why credit prices fluctuate from firm to firm. Interviews with firm owners in the Toronto computer animation and visual effects (CA&VFX) industries are then used to enrich the frequencies and help identify causal relationships. The results suggest that the use of collateral, loan amount, loan duration, and firm size are significant credit pricing influencers while a firm’s strategic orientation, specifically product innovation and propensity to export, are of little importance.


A Systems View of Cross-Border Shopping

Michael Lever
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Mai 2014

Michael Lever graduated Summa Cum Laude in 2010 with a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) from the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. Hea is supervised by Professor Michael S. Mulvey at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Throughout history, consumers have crossed borders to hunt for bargains or to access unique or varieties of items that are not available locally. Though the phenomenon of cross-border shopping is nothing new, the emergence of e-commerce and digital technologies has made it easier than ever for people to shop online with merchants across the world. Today’s consumers are empowered with smartphones and an array of web-based shopping tools that support and give rise to new forms of cross-border shopping. Moreover, growth in affordable international travel has immersed business- and tourist-travelers in foreign marketplaces populated with distinctive retailers. Concurrently, periods of economic flux prompt cross-border shoppers to develop coping strategies to deal with forces such as price discrepancies, exchange rate movements, windfalls and fallouts of free-trade agreements, and local merchants’ responses to the threats posed by foreign competitors. The purpose of this research is to take stock of traditional and emergent virtual forms of cross-border shopping, with a focus on Canadian shoppers, and outline a systematic effort directed at building a holistic theoretical view of cross-border shopping in the modern world.


Growth of Small Firms: An Alternative Look through the Lens of Effectuation

Oluwaseun Afolayan
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Mai 2014

Oluwaseun obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration and Management from the University of Ado-Ekiti and an MBA from Obafemi Awolowo University (both from Nigeria). He worked for 6 years at First Bank of Nigeria Plc and Oceanic Bank Plc (now Ecobank Nigeria Plc) as a Banking Officer. Prior to that he worked as a Sales/Marketing Officer for 2 years at University Press Plc, a foremost Nigerian publishing firm. He moved to Canada in 2012 to pursue his studies in the M.Sc. in Management at the Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa. He is studying under the supervision of Martine Spence, Full professor and Vice-Dean(Research) at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The importance of small firms in a country’s development cannot be over-emphasized. In view of this, it is important for them to grow in order to sustain their contributions to a country’s economy. Studies have shown how firms achieve growth using the traditional model of decision making (Causation) where adequate planning, market research and forecasting are used to gain relevant information about the firm’s market/industry. This planning enables the firms to compete favourably with other existing firms in the market. Effectuation as an alternative theory involves decision making processes under conditions of uncertainties where there is no adequate knowledge of the market due to its latent and emerging nature. Effectuation has been used to examine various concepts in entrepreneurship but there has been no real effort in applying it to the growth of small knowledge firms (SKIFs). This study, based on in-depth interviews with six SKIFS, highlights how effectuation can be applied to the growth of SKIFs and it examines how the four principles that underlie the theory help them to achieve growth. Results show that the four principles are applicable and help the SKIFs to achieve growth but as the case may be should be used jointly with causation.


Gender Based Financing Preferences of SMEs: Discouraged Borrowers

Richa Singh
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Mars 2014

Richa Singh has obtained a Bachelor of Technology in Informational Technology from Punjab Technical University (India) and an MBA in Finance from ICFAI University (India). She is studying under the supervision of Allan Riding, Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This research aims to investigate demand-side financing differences between male and female-owned small and medium enterprises in Canada from the perspective of discouraged borrowers using secondary data collected by Statistics Canada in 2004. The research examines the relationship between gender and extent of discouragement across SMEs while controlling for effects of firm-specific (age, size, industry, etc.) and owner-specific characteristics (education, experience, etc.) using a multivariate research method. The literature suggests that many young and small firms are discouraged borrowers, that is, they need finance but do not apply because they fear denial. To date, however, there remain a lack of studies examining if there is a relationship between gender and discouragement. This study examines such relationship and finds that majority-female owned firms are more likely to be discouraged borrowers as compared to majority-male owned firms. The study also offers support to arguments that strong relationships are important in reducing the probability of discouragement in both young and established firms.


"Right People, Right Place, Right Time": Exploring the Creation of Synergy within the EnRiCH-Québec City Partnership

Elizabeth Gagnon
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Février 2014

Elizabeth Gagnon graduated in 2011 with an Honours Bachelor in Health Sciences with a Minor in Psychology from the University of Ottawa. She is a student in the Master of Science in Health Systems Program, studying under the supervision of Tracey O’Sullivan, Associate Professor at the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, and Dan Lane, Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Many public health and social issues faced by society today are multifaceted and require joint and collaborative efforts through health promotion partnerships. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is one strategy that consists of engaging community stakeholders from various sectors to pool their expertise and resources in addressing health and social issues holistically. The literature indicates that the effectiveness of partnerships, such as those established within CBPR initiatives, is influenced by collaborative mechanisms that promote the creation of synergy among partners. There is, however, a lack of knowledge with regards to synergy and its key determinants in the context of health promotion partnerships. This qualitative thesis study is conducted as part of The EnRiCH Project, a CBPR initiative conducted in four communities across Canada, which aims at enhancing resilience and preparedness for disasters among high- risk populations. It explores the creation of synergy through the study of dynamics of collaboration shaping the EnRiCH-Québec City partnership and influencing its ability to leverage community resources for emergency preparedness. Emergent themes highlight that optimal collaboration in the EnRiCH-Québec City partnership is about having the “right people, in the right place, at the right time”. These findings provide evidence to inform community stakeholders, researchers and decision-makers on the dynamics of synergy creation and its implications for partnership growth and effectiveness.

Soutenances de thèses - 2013

A Model for Performance Evaluation of Pediatric Emergency Physicians

Javier Fiallos
Candidat à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2013

M.Sc. candidate in the Master of Science in Health Systems Program, Javier is studying under the supervision of Full Professor Wojtek Michalowski and Jonathan Patrick, Assistant Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Emergency Physicians’ (ED MDs) performance is multi-faceted and its assessment demands considering dimensions such as timeliness of care, resource utilization and health outcomes. Most evaluation methods require assigning weights to dimensions in order to determine their relative importance on a final score. Since human judgment is used to determine these weights, subjectivity is introduced. The purpose of this research is to develop a multi-dimensional evaluation tool for assessing performance of ED MDs. The proposed tool relies on Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), a method based on Linear Programming models, which reduces subjectivity in the assignment of weights. A DEA model was developed and tested by assessing the performance of 20 PED MDs from the Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO). Multiple evaluations were run on stratified data in order to identify benchmarks in each of seven categories of patients’ complaints and to determine the impact of assisting trainees in ED MDs’ performance. For each ED MD, performance scores and improvements per category of complaints were determined. Results revealed that most ED MDs perform better when they are not assisted by a trainee. DEA proved to be an appropriate tool for performance evaluation of ED MDs.


Alignment of Patient and Provider Views in Health Care Intervention Programs: A Study of the Centre for Healthy Active Living at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario

Asha Gajaria
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2013

Asha Gajaria graduated in 2010 with an Honours Bachelor of Health Sciences from the University of Ottawa. She is a student in the Master of Science in Health Systems Program, studying under the supervision of Wojtek Michalowski, Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management, and Raywat Deonandan, Assistant Professor at the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Many health issues that are facing the population today are chronic care problems associated with psychological or lifestyle behaviour issues. Management of many of these health issues relies on programs that are aimed at changing patients’ behaviours, in order to treat the underlying chronic health condition. One of such conditions is that of clinical obesity. Programs dealing with clinical obesity address underlying clinical conditions on one hand and also attempt to change patients’ behaviours on the other. Thus, in order for a program to be effective, especially in its behavioural component, it is important to determine what are the health care providers expectations with regards to what patients get out of the program so these expectations can be aligned with the patients’ views towards the program’s goals. This thesis research analyzes views of patients and providers participating in a clinical obesity management program designed for children and youth. The study examines the Centre for Healthy Active Living Treatment Program (CHAL) run by the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, designed for children and youth with complex clinical obesity.


Évaluation du processus utilisé pour recruter les infirmières autorisées à l’Hôpital Montfort : Une étude de cas

Vicki Sabourin
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2013

Vicki Sabourin a obtenu son diplôme en sciences infirmières de la Faculté des sciences de la santé de l’Université d’Ottawa en 2011. Elle est candidate à la maîtrise ès sciences en systèmes de santé et elle étudie sous la supervision de Douglas Angus, professeur titulaire à l’École de gestion Telfer et Ivy Bourgeault, professeure titulaire à l'École interdisciplinaire des sciences de la santé.

Résumé

Les infirmières et infirmiers autorisés (IA) sont des professionnels de la santé indispensables au système de santé. Plusieurs nouveaux postes d’IA ont été créés à l’Hôpital Montfort, un établissement de santé francophone offrant des soins de santé bilingues à Ottawa, à la suite d’un projet d'expansion majeur de l’Hôpital qui s’est terminé en 2010. Le but de cette thèse de maîtrise est d’identifier les facilitateurs et les barrières aux activités de recrutement utilisées par l’Hôpital Montfort pour attirer les IA bilingues vers leur établissement de santé et ensuite de formuler des recommandations ciblant les intervenants clés en recrutement. Dans cette étude de cas, basée sur une méthodologie de recherche qualitative, des entrevues semi-structurées ont eu lieu avec quatre groupes de participants ayant récemment participé au processus de recrutement de l’Hôpital Montfort (n=19). De plus, des observations non participantes ont été effectuées à différents salons de l’emploi ainsi qu’une vérification des documents pertinents pour le recrutement. Cette thèse de maîtrise contribue à approfondir les connaissances du recrutement et du maintien en poste des IA aptes à prodiguer des soins compétents à une population minoritaire francophone dans un système de santé bilingue.


A Comparative Analysis of Post-market Surveillance of Natural Health Products (NHP)

Suman Deep Kaur
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Novembre 2013

Suman étudie sous la supervision de Wojtek Michalowski and Dan Lane, professeurs titulaires à l'École de gestion Telfer.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Natural health products (NHPs) are attractive due to the public’s perception that they are natural and safe but there is wide variety of risks associated with these products. Post-market surveillance is the key to control hazards produced from NHPs. A set of activities are involved in post-market surveillance designed to assure the safety, efficacy and quality of products after being launched into the market. Although post-market surveillance is an efficient tool to preserve the safety of users from adverse reactions of NHPs, there are various challenges associated with performing post-market surveillance specifically for NHPs. The current research is focused on defining a framework for performing post-market surveillance for NHPs and identifying best practices in its application. An international comparative analysis was undertaken to formulate best practices by reviewing existing frameworks for post-market surveillance of NHPs in Australia, Germany, New Zealand, United Kingdom and United States. Evidence-based best practices are compared with the Canadian post-market surveillance framework to identify key gaps in the Canadian system. Recommendations are provided for bridging each gap, and making the Canadian NHPs surveillance system, strong according to the international standards of best practices.


The Incidence of Islamic Banking and Finance in Canada

Tanita Noor Tahmina
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Septembre 2013

Tanita Noor Tahmina obtained her B.Sc. (Joint honors) in Computer Science and Management Studies from the University of Nottingham, Malaysia campus. She has certifications - Certified Manager from Institute of Certified Professional Managers, Virginia; Certified Islamic Finance Expert from the Academy for International Modern Studies, UK. She is studying under the supervision of Allan Riding, Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This study aims to explore prospects of active participation by Canadian financial institutions in the Islamic financial industry to enhance the portfolio of innovative financial offerings which can enhance investment opportunities through non-interest and profit-loss sharing schemes of Islamic finance. Despite its diverse demographics and exposure to similar opportunities as other Western countries that have adopted the business model alongside conventional institutions, Canada has been relatively quiet in this area and as yet there is little evidence of Islamic finance windows operating in conventional institutions. This thesis addresses the question of why and subsequently how it can be brought within the activities of mainstream financial institutions by examining the supplier and management perspective.


The Determinants and Evolution of Major Inter-firm Transactions in U.S. Apparel Sector

Xiao Zhao
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Août 2013

Xiao (Mimosa) Zhao obtained a B.Sc in Fashion Design and Engineering from Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology (China). She is studying under the supervisor of Professor Margaret Dalziel.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This study provides a systematic description of the nature and evolution of major transactions in the U.S. apparel sector, using a theory that applies across sectors. This research investigates the determinants of the existence and magnitude of major inter-firm transactions, relying on a unique longitudinal dataset of over 2,000 of the largest transactional (buy-sell) relations between publicly traded firms in the U.S. apparel sector. The results indicate the importance of inter-firm complementarity, rather than inter-firm similarity, in explaining the sector architecture; thus contributing to the future improvement of industry classification systems. This study also contributes to a deeper understanding of the apparel sector focusing on the change in the relative importance of manufacturing activities versus service activities and in the involvement of firms from the outside apparel sector. Implications of inter-firm transactions are discussed regarding industry policies, and human and environmental welfare in manufacturing and raw materials industries.


Value Added by Venture Capitalists: The Case of EDC

Anoosheh Rostamkalaei
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2013

Anoosheh obtained a B.Sc. in Industrial Engineering from PolyTechnic of Tehran and a M.Sc. in Information Technology Management from National University, Tehran (Iran). She is studying under the supervision of Allan Riding, Full Professor, and the co-supervision of Kaouthar Lajili, Associate Professor at Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

It is generally well understood that venture capital (VC) is an important and significant source of financing for small firms. Questions revolving around the increased likelihood of a firm backed by Venture Capitalists (VCs) to be export oriented have yet to be fully explored. Responding to this research gap, a sample of Canadian VC backed firms is used to compare the performance of Canadian VC firms in terms of facilitating internationalization among their portfolio companies. The particular reference of this study is Export Development Canada (EDC), a crown corporation mandated to promote export among Canadian firms. This research finds that EDC as a VC investor and export-oriented consultant has no association with the increased probability of exporting. Also, stage of the investment does not show any relationship with internationalization. These results run contrary to previous speculation that syndication of VCs increases the probability of internationalization among portfolio firms.


Change and Integration in Senior Health Care Systems: The Case of Sault Ste. Marie

Jennifer McKenzie
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Avril 2013

Jennifer McKenzie is a candidate in the Master of Science in Health Systems Program and she is studying under the supervision of Craig Kuziemsky and Samia Chreim, Associate Professors at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This thesis organizes information that will assist a community in the selection or construction of a context sensitive integrated senior healthcare system model. The senior healthcare system within Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario is used as a case study. Institutional Ethnography is used to collect data guided by a change management model adapted from the literature. Data sources were non-participant observations, key informant interviews, focus groups, and texts. Institutional ethnographic local and high level analyses methods were used to analyze this data. Results identified many more restraining than driving forces for integration within Sault Ste. Marie’s senior healthcare system. Study findings indicate that macro level activities are perpetuating micro level obstacles to integration. These results can be used to identify where improvements need to be made at the macro level in order for successful change to occur at the micro level.


Cleantech SMEs’ Expectations and Perceptions of an Established Community-Based Intermediary Moving into their Sector

Sushil Dahiya
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Janvier 2013

Sushil has obtained his Bachelor of Commerce degree with a specialization in Management Information Systems. For his Master’s thesis, Sushil is working under the supervision Professor Tom Brzustowski and Professor Samia Chreim at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Innovation intermediaries such as research and development (R&D) performers, property-based enablers, technology transfer and commercialization entities, economic development organizations, industry associations, and business financing and support programs provide a range of services to assist firms during the process of innovation. How SMEs perceive innovation intermediaries is an area that requires further research as it would provide pertinent and important information towards learning how innovation intermediaries’ can assist small and medium enterprises (SMEs) more effectively. This study attempts to increase this understanding by focusing on the cleantech industry and exploring cleantech SMEs’ expectations and perceptions of an established community-based intermediary (CBI) moving in their sector. A qualitative research methodology primarily reliant on conducting interviews was adopted to collect data from a sample of 15 SMEs (16 interviews were conducted). In regards to SMEs, the results show that cleantech companies face financing, partnerships, marketing and sales, regulatory and bureaucratic challenges and these challenges are compounded due to the non-conventional solutions cleantech SMEs are trying to bring to the market. In regards to CBI, the results show how the capabilities of an intermediary in supporting one sector may constrain its performance in supporting another sector. The study discusses how the intermediary has to adjust its strategy, resources and processes to be effective in supporting the needs of companies in the new sector.

Soutenances de thèses - 2012

The Internationalization of Professional Service Firms: An Organizational Learning Approach

Anika Laperrière
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2012

Anika Laperrière détient un Baccalauréat en science commerciales (B. Com.), avec options en gestion internationale et en marketing de l’École de gestion Telfer de l’Université d’Ottawa. Sa thèse de maîtrise est supervisée par Martine Spence, vice-doyenne recherche et professeure titulaire à l’École de gestion Telfer.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The thesis explores how the internationalization process in small professional service firms impacts their resource-base renewal. The relationships between organizational learning, dynamic capabilities, operational capabilities and resources are empirically examined to determine the impact of internationalization on changes to the firm’s resource-base. The empirical analysis is based on in-depth case studies of 4 internationalized professional service firms in Ontario. The study finds evidence supporting the relationships between internationalization, learning and planned change via dynamic capabilities; and, internationalization, learning and ad hoc problem solving. Findings also suggest that the firms’ repetitive use of ad hoc problem solving when faced with similar situations leads to the creation of dynamic capabilities. This research adds to the existing body of literature of services, international entrepreneurship and strategy by responding to a call for empirical examination or organizational learning within the RBV and DC constructs. Furthermore, it also applies a novel theoretical framework with which to examine the impact of small firm internationalization and their strategic renewal.


Managerial Demographics: Conceptualization and Its Impact on the Innovation Performance of Manufacturing Firms

Asmita Sharma
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2012

Asmita Sharma is studying under the supervision of Mark Freel, Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The present thesis addresses the perceived gap in literature on the impact of managerial demographics on innovation performance of firms. Managerial demographics is a multidimensional construct and is conceptualised as managerial cognition, gender role, leadership role and management ratio. The study analyses the impact of the latter measures on innovation performance i.e. measured by the tendency of firms to perform innovation and the scale of innovation as measured by firms' innovation intensity. To present a comprehensive depiction of the influence of managerial demographics on firms, quantitative analysis is performed on survey data pertaining to 1,777 manufacturing firms, more or less evenly distributed among 12 European and Asian countries. The findings provide empirical evidence that some measures of managerial demographics are statistically more significant than others in augmenting the innovation performance and thus, contribute to the understanding of not-so-often researched managerial demographics-innovation relationship. The result has implications for both academic researchers as well as corporate policy-makers.


Identifying Communication Precursors to Medical Error in an In-Patient Clinical Environment: A Palliative Sedation Therapy Case Study

Alex Cornett
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Décembre 2012

Alex Cornett graduated from Cornell University with a Bachelor of Science in Policy Analysis and Management, and concentrations in Health and Gerontology. She is studying in the Health Systems Program under the supervision of Craig Kuziemsky, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This thesis seeks to identify and understand communication and information exchange events and their influencing factors that are precursors to medical errors. Palliative Sedation Therapy is used as a case study to understand how communication and information sharing occur on an in-patient palliative care unit. Results identified several communication issues that have the potential to act as precursors to medical error at different points in the communication act and resulted in the creation of a model identifying the points where these precursors can impact communication was created. These results can be used to identify how improvements to communication and information exchange can increase the effectiveness of communication and reduce the likelihood of medical errors occurring.


Problématique du choix thérapeutique : Application multicritère au cas de la fibrillation auriculaire (FA)

Emmanuel Kabura
Candidat à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Novembre 2012

Candidat à la maîtrise ès sciences en systèmes de santé, Emmanuel étudie sous la supervision de sa directrice de thèse, Sarah Ben Amor, professeure adjointe à l’École de gestion Telfer.

Résumé

Emmanuel Kabura travaille sur la problématique du choix thérapeutique appliquée au cas de la FA. Trois essais cliniques ARISTOTLE, RE-LY et ROCKET-AF, sont réalisés sur les trois nouveaux anticoagulants oraux qui sont l’Apixaban, le Dabigatran et le Rivaroxaban. Ils ne permettent pas de déterminer l’option thérapeutique optimale. Une approche d’aide multicritère à la décision a été élaborée en collaboration avec l’unité de cardiologie de l’Hôpital Montfort en vue de classer ces trois options pour la prise en charge des patients de la FA.


Navigating the Stroke Rehabilitation System: A Family Caregiver’s Perspective

Andrea Ghazzawi
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Novembre 2012

Andrea Ghazzawi holds a BSc. in Health Sciences from the University of Ottawa, and worked in research for 3 years for Dr. Tracey O’Sullivan. She pursued her MSc. in Health Systems under the supervision of Craig Kuziemsky, Associate Professor at Telfer School of Management and Tracey O’Sullivan, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Ottawa.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This exploratory study examined the family caregivers’ perceptions and experiences navigating the stroke rehabilitation system. The theories of continuity care and complex adaptive systems were used to examine the transition home from hospital or stroke rehabilitation facility, and in some cases back to hospital. Family caregivers (n=14) who provide care for a stroke survivor were recruited 4-12 weeks following the patient’s discharge from a stroke rehabilitation facility. Interviews were conducted with family caregivers to examine their perceptions and experiences navigating the stroke rehabilitation system. Directed content analysis was used to explore the perceptions of family caregivers as they reflected on the transitions home. The theories of continuity of care and complex adaptive systems were used to interpret their experiences. During the transition home from a rehabilitation facility, family caregivers are a constant source of support, providing the stroke survivor with continuity. Emergent themes highlight the importance of the caregiving role, and barriers and facilitators that impact the role, and influence continuity of care. Also, supports and services in the community were limited or did not meet the specific needs of the family caregiver. The acknowledgment of the unique attributes of each case will ensure supports and services are tailored to the family caregiver’s needs. Mitigation of systemic barriers would also decrease complexity experienced at the micro-level in the stroke rehabilitation system, and better support the family caregiver during the transition home from a stroke rehabilitation facility.


The Dynamics of Role Construction in Interprofessional Primary Health Care Teams

Kate MacNaughton
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Octobre 2012

Kate MacNaughton graduated in 2010 with a Bachelor of Science in Biology and Minor in Global Studies from the University of Ottawa. She pursued her M.Sc. under the supervision of Samia Chreim, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management, and Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, Full Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Ottawa.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This qualitative study explores how roles are constructed within interprofessional health care teams. It focuses on elucidating the different types of role boundaries, the influences on role construction and the implications for professionals and patients. A comparative case study was conducted with two interprofessional primary health care teams. The data collection included a total of 26 interviews (13 with each team) and non-participant observations of team meetings. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data and a model was developed to represent the emergent findings. The role boundaries are organized around interprofessional interactions (autonomous-collaborative boundaries) and the distribution of tasks (interchangeable-differentiated boundaries). Salient influences are categorized as structural, interpersonal and individual dynamics. The implications of role construction include professional satisfaction and more favourable wait times for patients. The elements in this conceptual model may be transferable to other interprofessional primary health care teams. It may benefit these teams by raising awareness of the potential impact of various within-team influences on role construction.


Predicting High-Cost Patients in General Population Using Data Mining Techniques

Seyed A. Izad Shenas
Candidat à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Octobre 2012

Seyed A. Izad Shenas, holds an MBA degree from the Sharif University of Technology, and an MD degree from the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (Iran). During his current master's in Health Systems, he has worked under the supervision of Dr. Bijan Raahemi (Supervisor) and Dr. Craig Kuziemsky (Co-Supervisor), Associate Professors at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

In this research, data mining techniques have been applied to a nationally-representative expenditure data from the US to predict very high-cost patients in the top 5 cost percentile, among the general population. Samples were derived from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey’s Household Component data for 2006-2008 including 98,175 records. After pre-processing, partitioning and balancing the data, the final MEPS dataset with 31,704 records was modeled by Decision Trees (including C5.0 and CHAID), and Neural Networks. Multiple predictive models were built and their performances were analyzed using various measures including correctness accuracy, G-mean, and Area under ROC Curve. We concluded that the CHAID tree returns the best G-mean and AUC measures for top performing predictive models ranging from 76% to 85%, and 0.812 to 0.942 units, respectively. Among a primary set of 66 predictors, the minimal set of attributes to estimate the top 5% high-cost population include individual’s overall health perception, history of blood cholesterol check, history of physical/sensory/mental limitations, age, and history of colonic prevention measures. This means we can predict high-cost patients without knowing how many times the patient was visited by doctors or hospitalized. Results from this study can be used by policy makers, health planners, and insurers to improve delivery of health services in a more efficient way.


Exploring the Supports Available for Health and Social Service Providers Responding to the Disaster in Haiti

Christine Fahim
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Septembre 2012

Christine (Tina) Fahim graduated in 2010 from the HBSc Health Sciences program at the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences (University of Ottawa. She is a member of Dr. Tracey O'Sullivan's research team for the EnRiCH project, a collaborative initiative that seeks to develop knowledge on the essential elements of resilience-oriented intervention programs to enhance preparedness, response and recovery during times of disaster. Tina also recently completed an internship at the World Health Organization in Copenhagen, Denmark in emergency preparedness and international health regulations. She pursued her MSc under the supervision of Dr. Dan Lane of the Telfer School of Management and Dr. Tracey O'Sullivan of the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The world has experienced multiple disasters in recent years that have highlighted the importance of effective disaster preparedness and response initiatives. Of these, the January 13, 2010, 7.0 earthquake that shook Port-au-Prince, Haiti serves as a unique example. The massive disaster made it difficult for local Haitian community officials to respond immediately, leaving the country reliant on foreign aid and international and non-governmental relief organizations. Within days, hundreds of organizations and volunteers mobilized to send physicians and medical specialists, nurses, physiotherapists, psychologists and social workers to the affected area. However, the political and financial instability of Haiti, in conjunction with limited resources and severe destruction from the earthquake, made it difficult to coordinate response efforts between hundreds of responding organizations. The literature indicates that when health professionals are disorganized and unprepared, they are at physical, emotional and mental risk which could hinder their effectiveness as first responders. While these risks have been made known, there is little literature that explores the effects of these risks on responders, particularly those in Haiti. As a result, this qualitative study will explore the various supports that were available to health and social service providers in Haiti by illustrating the lived experiences of these health professionals pre-deployment, on-site and post-deployment. These findings will support policy development regarding future disaster relief and the supports available to health and social service workers responding in the international disaster response.


Capacity Allocation for Emergency Surgical Scheduling with Multiple Priority Levels

Anisa Aubin
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Septembre 2012

Anisa Aubin earned a Bachelor of Mathematics degree and graduated with a First Class Honours in England. In September 2010 she moved to Ottawa to study under the supervision of Professor Patrick at the Telfer School of Management. So far she presented work in 2011 at INFORMS, Montreal, and in 2012 at CORS, Niagara Falls. .

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Emergency surgeries are serviced by three main forms of capacity: dedicated operating room time reserved for emergency surgeries, alternative (on call) capacity and lastly, canceling of elective surgeries. The objective of this research is to review capacity implications of meeting wait time targets for multiple priority levels in the context of emergency surgeries. A simulation was used to examine the trade-off between additional operating rooms capacity (and consequent idle capacity) versus increased numbers of rescheduling of elective surgeries while keeping reserved time low. Considered performance measures include utilization of operating room time, elective re-scheduling, and wait times by priority class. Although simulation does not provide an optimum solution it enables a comparison of different scenarios. Capacity needs to be available in order for wait time targets to be met. This simulation model can determine appropriate capacity levels for servicing emergency patients of different priorities with different wait time targets.


Innovation Dynamics and the Development of the Canadian Wine Industry

Evelyne Lord-Tarte
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Août 2012

Evelyne Lord-Tarte détient un Baccalauréat en sciences commerciales (B. Com.), avec option en gestion internationale de l’École de gestion Telfer de l’Université d’Ottawa. Elle travaille sous la supervision de son directeur de thèse David Doloreux, professeur titulaire à l’École de gestion Telfer de l’Université d’Ottawa et détenteur de la Chaire de recherche sur la francophonie canadienne en entreprenariat, innovation et développement régional.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This thesis explores the innovation and development of the Canadian wine industry. The main objectives are to present the key development factors, innovation dynamics, and collaborations, with particular emphasis on collaborations with higher education institutes. It also empirically assesses the extent to which there are systemic differences among the wine producing regions of British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. The empirical analysis is based on a firm-level survey of 146 firms, evenly distributed among the three regions. The findings provide empirical evidence that the Canadian wine industry is very innovative and its innovation process is locally embedded. Moreover, the development of the Canadian wine industry differs according to its regional context. This research contributes to the literature by providing insights into the relationship between the developments of a single sector within different regions of the same country.


Exploring the Relationship between Leadership, Organizational Learning Capability and the Mediating Role of Trust

Ira Grover
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Août 2012

Ira Grover received a Honours Bachelor of Arts degree with a specialization in Psychology and Human Resources from the University of Waterloo. Since September 2010, she has been studying under the supervision of Professor Emeritus and Interis Research Fellow, Swee C. Goh. Ira was also the recipient of the Interis Scholarship for MSc. students.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The purpose of this research is to study how organizations maintain their competitive advantage in today’s turbulent and highly competitive business environment, by striving to become a learning organization. The impact of factors such as leadership (both transformational and transactional leadership) and trust on an organization’s learning capability is empirically examined. This research adds to the existing body of literature in two ways. First, it argues that a transactional leadership style can influence learning, despite research spanning the last decade that has focused on transformational leadership theory as the dominant model of effective leadership. Therefore, the importance of both leadership styles, each having valuable differential effects is emphasized in this study. Second, the previously untested role of trust as mediating the relationship between leadership and organizational learning capability is examined. It is argued that without supervisor trust, the opportunities for a learning organization to reach its full potential and subsequently develop learning capabilities is reduced. Findings from this study support the influence of both leadership styles on learning. Trust in ones supervisor was also found to fully mediate the relationship between leadership and learning.


Comprehensiveness of the RUG-III Grouping Methodology in Addressing the Needs of People with Dementia in Long-Term Care

Marie-Andrée Cadieux
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2012

Marie-Andrée Cadieux détient un baccalauréat spécialisé en sciences de la santé de l’École Interdisciplinaire des sciences de la santé avec une mineure en administration des affaires de l’École de gestion Telfer (Université d’Ottawa). Elle travaille sous la supervision de ses directeurs de thèse Linda Garcia, directrice de l’École Interdisciplinaire des sciences de la santé et doyenne associée de la Faculté des sciences de la santé de l’Université d’Ottawa, et Jonathan Patrick, professeur adjoint à l’École de gestion Telfer.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The purpose of this study was to determine the comprehensiveness of the RUG-III (34 Group) grouping methodology in addressing the needs of residents with dementia living in long-term care. Although the system contains a separate hierarchy for classifying residents with cognitive impairment and has been validated in many countries, some still question whether the newer formula adequately reflects the care needs of residents with dementia. A three part methodology was adopted. The needs of residents with dementia were identified from the best current evidence in the scientific literature. The documented needs were subsequently linked with the items of the grouping methodology and their importance as suggested by the literature was analyzed in relation with the priority of the items within the system. In total 19 needs were identified. Results revealed that the RUG-III appears to capture needs relevant to direct nursing care. Needs identified as most important to people with dementia such as social needs do not appear to be thoroughly considered in the grouping methodology. Future research is needed to validate the significance of the needs identified and the cost to satisfying these needs in long-term care.


Neighbourhood Characteristics and Preventable Hospitalisations in a Predominantly Urban Canadian City (Ottawa)

Geneviève Prud'homme
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2012

Geneviève Prud’homme holds a Bachelor in Environmental Health (Population Stream) from McGill University (2006). She worked in environmental quality, healthcare and community health promotion research both in Canada and internationally. Currently, Geneviève is a researcher for a program evaluation company and she is conducting her Master thesis under the supervision of Kevin Brand, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management, and Elizabeth Kristjansson, Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa School of Psychology.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Enhancing primary care is key to the Canadian health care reform. Considered as an indicator of primary care access and quality, hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions are commonly reported by Canadian organisations as sentinel events signaling problems with the delivery of primary care. However, the literature calls for further research to identify what lies behind ACS hospitalisation rates in predominantly urban regions with universal access to health care. A theoretical model was built and, using an ecological design, multiple regressions were implemented to identify which neighbourhood characteristics explained the socio-economic gradient in ACS hospitalisation rates observed in Ottawa. Among these neighbourhoods, healthy behaviour and - to a certain extent - health status were significantly associated with ACS hospitalisation rates. Evidence of an association with primary care accessibility was also signaled for the more rural neighbourhoods. Smoking prevention and cessation campaigns may be the most relevant strategies to push forward by policy makers hoping to prevent ACS hospitalisations in Ottawa. From a health care equity perspective, targeting these campaigns to neighbourhoods of low socio-economic status may contribute to closing the gap in ACS hospitalisations described in this current study.


Assessment of the Commercialization Capabilities of Canadian Technology Firms

Boushra El Haj Hassan
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Février 2012

Boushra El Haj Hassan received her Bachelor of Commerce Degree in Management Information Systems from the University of Ottawa in 2008. She is working under the direction of Dr. Ajax Persaud, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Innovation and commercialization are crucial for the competitiveness and economic well-being of countries. Despite the importance of innovation, recent studies have showed that Canada is lagging behind other countries in terms of its innovation and commercialization performance. The claim is often made that Canada performs well in generating the knowledge needed for innovation; however, the problem lies in transforming this knowledge into commercial success. Thus, a major preoccupation is how to turnaround this weak commercialization performance. Despite the wide range of programs, policies and regulations implemented by the Canadian Government along with its provincial counterparts to engender a turnaround, little has changed in Canada’s commercialization performance. Therefore, the search for solutions continues. Given that commercialization takes place at the firm-level, this study will explore the relationship between firm-size and commercialization. Several existing studies have examined the link between innovation and firm size, but few have examined the link between commercialization and firm size. Despite the arguments supporting medium-sized firms’ ability to commercialize innovations, there is a weak empirical base that explores the position of Canadian medium-sized firms and their innovation and commercialization capabilities. This study will contribute to the existing knowledge by covering the gap in the literature concerning the role of medium-sized firms in commercialization, compared to small and large firms. This study provides evidence suggesting that small and medium-sized firms should be considered differently. This study is mainly based on the analysis of data gathered by Statistics Canada through the Survey on the Commercialisation of Innovation, 2007. Data covered the biotechnology sector, the information and communication technology sector, and the manufacturing sector.

Soutenances de thèses - 2011

Innovation Intermediation Activities and the Actors that Perform Them

Weiwei Wu
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Septembre 2011

Weiwei has obtained her Bachelor degree in China University of Geosciences. Her current research direction is innovation management under the supervision of Margaret Dalziel, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

While many organizational actors, including firms, governments, universities, and non-profit organizations may have an impact on the innovative capacity of the firms with which they engage, we have little knowledge of their relative impacts. The literature on innovation intermediaries reports on the significant impacts of only specific types of organizations, and the studies on Community Innovation Survey (CIS) data generally report that firms dominate as sources of information and as collaborators. In the interests of a better understanding of the relative nature and degree of the innovation enabling contributions of a range of organizational actors, I conduct a comparative examination of the contributions of firms, governments, universities, industry associations, and research institutes. Using survey data from a global sample of 499 firms, I identify the organizational actors that are most strongly associated with each of ten innovation intermediation activities. I find that firms are most strongly associated with the importance of three enabling activities, namely, identifying partner firms, helping firms learn business advice, and helping firms learn about new markets; universities are most strongly associated with the importance of another three enabling activities, namely, providing firms with technology, identifying knowledgeable individuals, and undertaking innovative activities on behalf of firms; governments are most strongly associated with the importance of coercive activities such as promoting standards and forcing focal firms to innovate through regulations or social pressure; industry associations are most strongly associated with the importance of facilitating multiple partner innovation collaborations. The effect of for-profit firms is weaker in Asia than in North America, and the effects of universities and industry associations are weaker for respondent firms in service sectors than for respondent firms in manufacturing sectors.


The Influence of Follower Behaviour on Leaders’ Trust in Followers

Nicholas Bremner
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Août 2011

Nicholas Bremner est étudiant à la maîtrise ès sciences en gestion. Il étudie sous la supervision de son directeur de thèse, Laurent Lapierre, professeur agrégé à l’École de gestion Telfer.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Followers play an essential role in the leadership process. For an individual to be a leader, they must have followers. Despite this, follower behaviours and characteristics have oftenbeen overlooked in leadership research. It has not been until recently that scholars have started to seriously consider the more active role that followers can play in the leadership phenomenon. It has been argued that if we are to achieve a more complete understanding of the leadership process, the focus of future research must be shifted to carefully consider the role of followers. The current research adds to the burgeoning literature of followership by examining how followers' behaviour can influence their leader's trust in them. Specifically, this thesis explores the relationship between follower behaviours, leaders’ perceptions of follower trustworthiness (trusting beliefs), and leaders’ subsequent willingness to be vulnerable to the actions of their followers (trusting intentions). Leaders’ implicit followership theories (IFTs; assumptions about the traits and behaviours that characterize effective followers) were examined as a potential moderator of both relationships. Results revealed that passive followership influenced leaders’ trusting beliefs negatively, whereas collaborative followership had a positive influence on leaders’ trusting beliefs as well as leaders’ trusting intentions. The most extreme form of proactive followership, challenging followership, had nonsignificant relationships with leaders’ trusting beliefs and intentions. In addition, leaders’ IFTs did not interact with followership behaviour to produce any change in leaders’ trusting beliefs. However, IFTs were found to moderate the relationship between leaders’ trusting beliefs and trusting intentions. The results have implications for developing more effective and rewarding working relationships for employees and their supervisors.


Exploring the Relationship between Organizational Learning Capacity, Trust, and Politics: An Empirical Study

Andrew Tirelli
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juillet 2011

Andrew has obtained his Bachelor of Commerce degree with a specialization in Human Resource Management from the University of Ottawa. He is also a member of the Human Resource Professionals Association and is currently completing a Certified Human Resource Professional Designation. Andrew is studying under the supervision of Swee Goh, Interis Fellow and Full Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The factors that encourage the development of organizational learning, trust, and politics as well as their influences on organizations are well-established topics of discussion in the management literature. However, despite a plethora of empirical literature surrounding the organizational learning, politics, and trust constructs, researchers have yet to explore their relationship with one another. While literature regarding organizational learning has grown substantially over the last decade, studies continue to investigate a common set of established factors that support the development of this practise. As such, the purpose of the current research study is to address a need to examine two overlooked yet critical variables in the organizational learning literature: organizational trust and politics. More specifically, this study will assess the role that organizational trust plays in building organizational learning capabilities, as well as how the presence of organizational politics influences this relationship. The results will also shed light on the impact that organizational trust, politics, and learning capability have on organizational commitment and turnover.


An Assessment of LEED Certification’s Impact on Net Rental Rates for Commercial Office Space in Toronto

Shawn Roy
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juillet 2011

Shawn Roy received his Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Ottawa, after which he worked in commercial real estate brokerage in Ontario and Alberta. He is currently working under the supervision of thesis advisors Scott Ensign, Associate Professor, and Tom Brzustowski, RBC Financial Group Professor in the Commercialization of Innovation at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

With issues such as energy crises, climate change and environmental degradation becoming evermore prevalent on national and international levels, industrialized societies are beginning to take heed of the impact they are having on the natural environment and we are beginning to see movements towards socially and environmentally responsible decision-making. With the impact that buildings have on the environment, it is important to understand what barriers are preventing or slowing the adoption of socially and environmentally responsible property. The present study looks to provide evidence of the economic value that LEED certification provides to office building owners in downtown Toronto, Ontario – value determined by the average net asking rent for each building. For some 68 subject and control buildings, we will match information on the net asking rent for LEED rated office buildings to otherwise comparable properties (control buildings). Using stepwise regression analysis, we look to find what relationship exists between assessed value and the LEED label. Controlling for other variables historically shown to have an impact on property value, the results of this study will determine whether there is a business case for LEED certification in the downtown Toronto office market.


Partial Least Square (PLS) Application to Supply Chain Management (SCM) Systems

Mehmet Onur Kadarag
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2011

Mehmet Onur Karadag received his Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Engineering from Bilkent University – Ankara, Turkey in 2008. He is working under the direction of his supervisor, Dr. Jonathan Linton, Power Corporation Professor in the Management of Technological Enterprises at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This study considers if optimizing process metrics and settings across a supply chain gives significantly different outcomes than consideration at a firm or step level. While, the importance of supply chain integration has been shown in areas such as inventory management, this appears to be the first empirical test for optimizing process settings. A Partial Least Squares (PLS) procedure is used to determine the crucial components and indicators that make up each component in a supply chain system. This allows supply chain members to have a greater understanding of critical coordination components and to use these insights to improve their overall supply chain performance. Results and implications give an indication of what performance is possible with supply chain optimization versus local optimization on simulated and manufacturing data. It was found that pursuing an integrated approach over a traditional independent approach provides an improvement of 2% to 49% in explanatory power for the supply chain under study.


Marketing Strategy in Social Enterprises: An Exploratory Study

Alex Mitchell
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2011

Alex Mitchell received his B.A. Honours Degree from Carleton University in 2002, and is currently a Senior Content and Community Lead for Adobe Systems Incorporated. He is working under the direction of his supervisors, Dr. Judith Madill, Paul Desmarais Professor, and Dr. Samia Chreim, Associate Professor at the Telfer School of Management.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Due to increasing emergence of social needs and problems throughout the world, accompanied by reduced government ability to provide the funding necessary to effectively combat these problems, it is expected that social enterprises will grow in number and importance. Because of this growing importance, and the lack of research concerning marketing practices in such organizations, this thesis develops a deeper understanding of marketing in social enterprises, and the social enterprise context that has the potential to affect marketing strategies employed in such organizations. A model of marketing strategy in social enterprises is developed an proposed, based on empirical qualitative research consisting of a comparative study of fifteen cases of social enterprises. Results show that four major dualities represent the critical context of social enterprises that influence the marketing strategies employed. Marketing is viewed as important by these enterprises and the strategies employed are quite well developed in the areas of market research, product quality, branding, and promotion.


The Performance of Immigrant-owned Business Ventures

François Neville
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Juin 2011

François Neville détient un baccalauréat en sciences commerciales (spécialisation marketing) de l’École de gestion Telfer. Il travaille sous la supervision de ses directeurs de thèse, Barbara Orser et Allan Riding, Professeurs Deloitte en gestion des entreprises de croissance.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Employing a representative sample of small- and medium-sized enterprises, this study examines the performance of immigrant-owned business ventures (IBVs) and firms owned by non-immigrants. The study also presents a comprehensive profile of Canadian IBVs. Anecdotal evidence has suggested that many successful growth-oriented firms have been started and managed by immigrant entrepreneurs. Immigrant business owners are also thought to bring to business start-up unique managerial acumen and social capital derived from diverse experiences and international networks. To date, however, there remains a lack of substantive evidence regarding the performance of immigrant-owned ventures. The study also considers the performance of comparable groups of new firms owned by non-immigrant entrepreneurs, with a particular focus on the relationship between firm internationalization and enterprise performance. The results lend support to arguments that owner-level factors influence the process of internationalization among SMEs and that, compared to non-immigrant business owners, immigrant business owners retain entrepreneurial acumen that is conducive to the internationalization of young ventures. Results lend support to arguments that owner-level factors influence the process of internationalization among SMEs and that, compared to non-immigrant business owners, immigrant business owners retain entrepreneurial acumen that is conducive to the internationalization of young ventures. The implications of the findings for research and policy are considered.


The Global Financial Crisis: Impacts on SMEs and Government Responses

Linna Wan
Candidate à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Mai 2011

Yue (Linna) Wan est candidate à la maîtrise ès sciences en gestion de l’École de gestion Telfer. Linna étudie le financement des petites et moyennes entreprises sous la direction de son superviseur, Allan Riding, Professeur Deloitte en gestion des entreprises de croissance.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The global financial crisis (GFC) has, since 2008, had profound effects on all sectors and across all economies, but particularly on small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). To help SMEs survive the GFC, most governments implemented remedial programs. This research examines the stated aims, strategic initiatives and targets of a sample of these programs through the analysis of secondary data. Findings revealed that, as a result of the GFC, governments have developed programs aimed not only at new obstacles but also at some of the pre-existing challenges that faced SMEs. Overall, government initiatives covered most of the serious obstacles faced by SMEs and government assistance programs aimed at SMEs tended to have been augmented in light of the GFC. Financing and taxation programs tended to be designed to achieve their goals directly, where other programs tended to achieve them in a more indirect manner. The aims did not differ materially between developed and less-developed economies.


Priority Setting: A Method that Incorporates a Health Equity Lens and the Social Determinants of Health into the Process

Alejandra Jaramillo Garcia
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Avril 2011

Alejandra Jaramillo has a BSc in Business Administration from the Tecnologico de Monterrey in Mexico. She received a scholarship funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). She is currently a member of the science team at the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) that assists the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care in the development of clinical practice guidelines. These guidelines support primary care health professionals, such as family physicians and nurses, in the delivery of preventive care. Elle étudie sous la supervision de ses directeurs de thèse, Monique Bégin, professeure émérite et professeure invitée à l’École de gestion Telfer, et Dr. Peter Tugwell, professeur en médecine et en épidémiologie & médecine sociale à l'Université d'Ottawa.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The Cochrane Collaboration is an international network dedicated to assisting healthcare professionals, policy makers, patients and their caregivers, make informed decisions about health care. This is done by summarizing and disseminating the most up to date information on a variety of topics related to human health care. Such summaries are called "systematic reviews". From its inception in 1993, Cochrane has produced more than 4,000 systematic reviews but estimates that at least 10,000 are required to summarize the health care information produced to date and that 5,000 per year will need to be updated. Existing financial resources and qualified staff are not able to meet the current demand for information. Such constraints have forced Cochrane to take a closer look at the way resources are allocated and priorities are set. The objective of this research was to develop a structured and sustainable approach to setting priorities within Cochrane that incorporates health equity and that is based on the needs of those that require the information. This method was tested and evaluated in the field by partnering with the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group in setting priorities for Osteoarthritis.

Soutenances de thèses - 2010

Entrepreneurship in the Periphery and the Role of Social Networks: A Study of Businesses in Iqaluit, Nunavut

Chris McCluskey
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Novembre 2010

Chris McCluskey détient un baccalauréat en sciences commerciales de l’Université d’Ottawa. Il étudie sous la supervision de son directeur de thèse, Scott Ensign, professeur adjoint à l’École de gestion Telfer. Le projet de recherche de Chris a été mené à Iqaluit au Nunavut.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The research explores both how businesses and entrepreneurs operate from a social network perspective and, more generally, how business in the North mirrors and differs from that in the South. Using a qualitative approach, the findings suggest possible reasons for the disproportionately low numbers of Inuit entrepreneurs and describe how some networks are activated in business in the North.


Impact of Proximity and Management Intervention on Knowledge Transfer in Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

Chen Dong Lin
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Novembre 2010

C.D. Lin holds a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration from the Rotterdam School of Management at Erasmus University. In 2009, he obtained a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Master’s Scholarship through the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Il étudie sous la supervision de son directeur de thèse, professeur Ajax Persaud et de ses co-superviseurs, les professeurs Samia Chreim et Scott Ensign de l’École de gestion Telfer.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The research proposes a conceptual framework to investigate how management intervention and various dimensions of proximity (i.e. geographical, cognitive, and organizational) influence knowledge transfer and innovation in technology-based mergers and acquisitions (M&A). A multiple qualitative case study involving three cross-border technology-based M&A is conducted to support the thesis.


A Model of Continuity of Care in the Context of Women’s Mental Health: An Exploratory Study of an Interprofessional Team Approach to Eating Disorders

Anne Brasset-Latulippe
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Novembre 2010

Anne Brasset-Latulippe completed her undergraduate studies in Psychology (McGill University) and Occupational Therapy (University of Ottawa). During the course of her Master of Science in Health Systems, Anne obtained a Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship, a master's award administered by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and an Admission and Excellence Scholarships from the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies at the University of Ottawa. Pendant cette même période, Anne a également complété un diplôme de deuxième cycle de recherche en politiques et en services de santé émis par le Centre Ontarien de Formation. Elle étudie sous la supervision de son directeur de thèse, Craig Kuziemsky, professeur adjoint et directeur du programme de maîtrise ès sciences en systèmes de santé à l’École de gestion Telfer.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The overall goal of this research is to study continuity of care in the context of team-based care delivery to support adolescent women’s mental health issues, specifically those involving anorexia or bulimia. The three concepts of continuity of care described by Haggerty et al. (2003) - relational, managerial and informational continuity – were used to develop an exploratory model of continuity of care for women’s mental health.


Emergency Department Use: Why Do Patients Choose the Emergency Department for Medical Care and How Much Does It Really Cost?

Saunya Dover
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Novembre 2010

Saunya Dover has a BSc in Human Kinetics from the University of Ottawa. She received a scholarship funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). She is currently working as a research assistant in the Clinical Epidemiology Program at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. Elle étudie sous la supervision de son directeur de thèse Doug Angus, professeur titulaire à l’École de gestion Telfer, et de son co-directeur, Alan Forster, professeur agrégé en médecine à l’Université d’Ottawa.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

The reduced access to health care is a growing problem in Canada. Budget cuts and other economic pressures have resulted in hospital and bed closures across the country. Together with a shortage of physicians, these issues have resulted in difficulties for Canadians in obtaining timely care. In order to continue to provide the best possible care in a sustainable manner, it is important not only to understand the cost of delivering care in the Emergency Department (ED) but also Canadians’ expectations of health services. The objectives of this project are to examine the reasons patients are seeking to ED care, as well as to conduct a cost minimization analysis to compare the costs of seeking care in the ED versus seeking similar care in a primary care setting.


Chronically Ill Patients' View of Health, Illness and the Healing Relationships in Integrative Medicine

Nathalie Richard
Candidate à la M.Sc. en systèmes de santé
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Avril 2010

Nathalie Richard holds a Bachelor’s degree in Health Sciences from the University of Calgary. She studies under the supervision of Telfer professors Doug Angus and Samia Chreim and professor Ivy Bourgeault from the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Health Sciences.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

Integrative medicine is defined as the combination of conventional (allopathic) and alternative medicine. The increasing popularity of integrative medicine requires that we understand the meaning that patients attribute to their treatment experience. The purpose of this project is to illustrate how patients perceived their experience of living with a chronic illness and their integrative treatment process.


Real Option Pricing Model Applied to Industrial and Regional Benefits Policy

Sébastien Casault
Candidat à la M.Sc. en gestion
École de gestion Telfer

Soutenance : Avril 2010

Sébastien Casault est candidat à la maîtrise ès sciences en gestion de l’École de gestion Telfer. Il détient un diplôme en physique de l’Université de Waterloo et de l’Université d’Ottawa. Sébastien étudie les politiques de l’innovation sous la direction de son superviseur, professeur Jonathan Linton, et en collaboration avec Industrie Canada.

Résumé (en anglais seulement)

This research intends to inform policy discussion on the subject of Aerospace and Defence sector procurement strategies at Industry Canada (IC). Specifically, this research explores procurement strategies in terms of a real option pricing model that move toward a novel use of Industrial and Regional Benefits (IRB) policies in promoting sector-specific, innovation-driven growth. It is further hypothesized that IRB obligations (i.e., offset agreement) can be better tailored to encourage value adding activities within prime contractors’ supply chains (typically small and medium enterprises in this sector). This research focuses on the novel development of a decision support tool using a theory of option pricing for derivatives whose returns fluctuate according to a power law distribution. This tool is shown to provide guidance to assist in adequately rewarding prime contractors who invest in innovative activities while fulfilling their IRB obligations.


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